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From Lewis Carroll's own drawings to the latest books and films, some of the many ways the girl who went down the rabbit hole has been brought to life

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Alice as envisioned by Lewis Carroll, in the hand-written and hand-illustrated version of the book he gave to Alice Liddell and her sisters.

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The original Alice, so to speak. This is one of John Tenniel's timeless depictions in the first published edition of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865). Tenniel was a British illustrator who was well known for his editorial cartoons and humorous caricatures before he took on the job of illustrating Lewis Carroll's book.

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Alice as depicted by Arthur Rackham in a 1907 edition of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Rackham was a British illustrator whose work appears in many children's books from the early 1900s.

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A cherubic Alice as portrayed by Maria Kirk in 1907 in an edition by the U.S. firm Frederick A. Stokes

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Alice in the Duchess's kitchen, by the famed British illustrator Mabel Lucie Attwell. The 1910 edition with Attwell's illustrations is extremely rare.

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Alice as depicted by A.E. Jackson in a 1914 edition of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland published by the American house George H. Doran Company

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Alice as conceived by the Walt Disney company in the 1951 animated film called Alice in Wonderland. Walt Disney had a lifelong obsession with bringing Alice's Adventures in Wonderland to the big screen; he began his career in the 1920s producing short silent films about Alice and spent years attempting to make a feature-length version.

©Walt Disney Co./Courtesy Everett Collection

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Ralph Steadman's version of Alice for a 1967 edition of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Steadman, a British illustrator, is best known for the work he did with Hunter S. Thompson.

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Alice as conceived by the legendary comic book writer Alan Moore (Watchman, V for Vendetta) in his erotic graphic novel, Lost Girls. Alice is on the right; that's Dorothy from the Wizard of Oz in the middle, and Wendy from Peter Pan is on the left. Lost Girls tells the story of the three women meeting in a hotel and swapping stories of their sexual adventures. The Guardian's review of Lost Girls began this way: "We'll get to the anal sex, horse masturbation and incest in a minute."

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Salvador Dali's statue of Alice in Wonderland with jump-rope, on display in Paris in 1995. Dali also produced, in 1969, a collection of 13 illustrations inspired by Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

Francois Mori

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Alice by the Canadian artist/engraver George A. Walker, who illustrated extremely rare editions of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass published by Cheshire Cat Press in the late 1990s (a copy of each is on display at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, England). Twenty-six of the images have just been re-released in A is for Alice (Porcupine's Quill, 64 pages, $12.95).

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The singer Beyonce as Alice, in a photo by Annie Leibovitz that was commissioned by Disney Parks in 2007. Lyle Lovett is the March Hare, and Oliver Platt is the Mad Hatter.

Annie Leibovitz

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A punk Alice, as envisioned by a new edition of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland illustrated by the American artist Camille Rose Garcia (Collins Design, 160 pages, $19.99). Garcia was born in Los Angeles in 1970 and grew up "going to punk shows with other disenchanted youth of that era."

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Mia Wasikowska as Alice from the upcoming (March 5) Tim-Burton-directed movie version, Alice in Wonderland.

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