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The Weinstein domino effect: Who else is accused of sexual misconduct so far? Read the list

SEXUAL HARASSMENT

The Weinstein domino effect: Who else is accused of sexual misconduct so far? Read the list

A Hollywood mogul's ouster has brought forward more stories of misogyny and abuse in cinema and other industries, and renewed focus on old accusations against alleged predators. Some men have faced serious consequences after the Weinstein affair; others haven't. Check back here for updates to the list

Background: From Weinstein to #metoo

For three decades, producer Harvey Weinstein was one of Hollywood's most powerful players. Miramax, the production company he co-founded with his brother Bob, won dozens of Oscars for movies like Shakespeare in Love, The English Patient and Pulp Fiction and launched the careers of major film stars.

Rumours persisted for years that Mr. Weinstein was using his prestige and influence to sexually exploit women in the film industry. Then on Oct. 5, The New York Times opened the floodgates: In an investigative report, several actresses and former employees gave firsthand accounts of Mr. Weinstein demanding sexual favours, promising fame and threatening ruined careers.

More women came forward with stories about his alleged abuse. Three women, including Italian actress Asia Argento, told The New Yorker magazine that Mr. Weinstein raped them. Further reports alleged that Mr. Weinstein tried to quash the New York Times and New Yorker's investigations using private detectives, including former Mossad agents, to track the journalists and the women who spoke with them.

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After the initial Times story broke, Mr. Weinstein took a leave of absence from The Weinstein Company, which later fired him. Police in New York, Los Angeles and London reviewed sex-assault claims against him and the state of New York began pursuing a civil-rights probe of his company. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted to expel Mr. Weinstein from their ranks. Directors, producers and filmmakers faced intensifying questions about how much they knew about his conduct and when.

But the public conversation also shifted to broader questions of institutional sexism and violence against women. Using the hashtag #MeToo, women and men began sharing their stories of harassment and abuse. New complaints, official and otherwise, surfaced against powerful men in film, TV, the news media and politics, while old complaints got renewed public attention. Below are some examples of the major ones.


THE LIST

Who else has been accused so far?


Film and TV

Paul Haggis: The Oscar-winning Canadian screenwriter is being sued in New York by publicist Haleigh Breest, who says Mr. Haggis raped her in 2013 after a film premiere. After the civil suit was filed in December, three more women came forward alleging rape and other sexual misconduct. Mr. Haggis and his lawyer have denied the allegations.

Director Paul Haggis poses for a photo in Toronto during the 2014 Toronto International Film Festival.

James Toback: In an Oct. 22 story, the Los Angeles Times published accounts from 38 women accusing the screenwriter/director of sexual harassment. They alleged that he would boast about his celebrity connections to lure women into what he called auditions or interviews, where he would ask them humiliating questions, dry-hump them or masturbate in front of them. Within days, the number of women who came forward about Mr. Toback's past behaviour had risen to 310, LA Times reporter Glenn Whipp said. These included Canadian actress Rachel McAdams, who told Vanity Vair Mr. Toback had made unwanted sexual advances toward her in 2001.

James Toback, shown in Beverly Hills on July 25, 2013.

Kevin Spacey: The star of The Usual Suspects and American Beauty has been accused by multiple people of unwanted sexual advances and harassment, dating back decades. The scandal began when actor Anthony Rapp told BuzzFeed News about an incident in 1986, when Mr. Rapp was 14 and Mr. Spacey was 26. Mr. Rapp Mr. Spacey, whom he befriended when they performed on Broadway together, invited him to his Manhattan apartment one night, climbed on top of him and sexually propositioned him. More men came forward to accuse Mr. Spacey of sexual harassment during his 11-year tenure as artistic director of London's Old Vic theatre (which uncovered 20 allegations of inappropriate behaviour from Mr. Spacey, from 1995 to 2013) and from employees of his Netflix series House of Cards. Mr. Spacey took time away from acting after apologizing to Mr. Rapp, and various organizations working with him have severed ties: Netflix cancelled House of Cards, while director Ridley Scott cut him out of his film All the Money in the World, choosing to reshoot his scenes with Christopher Plummer instead.

Feb. 23, 2016: Kevin Spacey arriving for the Season 4 premiere screening of House of Cards in Washington.

Brett Ratner: Six women, including actresses Natasha Henstridge and Olivia Munn, accused the film director of sexual harassment or misconduct in interviews with the Los Angeles Times. One incident allegedly took place on an Air Canada flight in 2005, where actress Jaime Ray Newman said Mr. Ratner spoke loudly and in detail about sex acts he wanted to perform on her. Mr. Ratner's lawyer, Martin Singer, denied the allegations. Ellen Page later alleged that Mr. Ratner made her feel "violated" when he allegedly sexually harassed her on set of X-Men: The Last Stand. She also accuses him of outing her to the cast and crew when she was 18.

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Jan. 19, 2017: Brett Ratner attending a ceremony in Hollywood for his star on the Walk of Fame.

Bill Cosby: The Weinstein scandal emerged the month before Mr. Cosby, a former comedian accused of sexual assault by more than 50 women, was due for a retrial on allegations from one Canadian complainant, Andrea Constand, who says he drugged and raped her in 2004. A previous trial in the Constand case ended in a hung jury this past summer. After Mr. Weinstein's ouster from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, two of Mr. Cosby's other accusers wrote to the academy asking for him to be expelled too.

Aug. 22, 2017: Bill Cosby departs after a pretrial hearing at the Montgomery County Courthouse in Norristown, Pa.

Roman Polanski: The director of Chinatown and Rosemary's Baby pleaded guilty in 1977 to drugging and raping a 13-year-old, but he fled to Europe before sentencing and has lived there ever since. Other allegations of abuse surfaced while he lived in France, Switzerland and Poland, where prosecutors tried and failed to extradite him back to the United States. The Weinstein incident hasn't so far changed Mr. Polanski's legal circumstances, but it prompted a new allegation of sexual assault against him from a California artist, Marianne Barnard, who told Britain's Sun newspaper Mr. Polanski molested her in 1975.

French-Polish director Roman Polanski, shown on May 27, 2017.

Woody Allen: The auteur director's adopted daughter Dylan Farrow says Mr. Allen sexually abused her when she was seven, a claim he continues to deny. After the allegations against Mr. Weinstein – a long-time collaborator on films like Mighty Aphrodite and Bullets Over Broadway – Mr. Allen called him a "sad, sick man," but denied having heard rumours of Weinstein's behaviour "with any real seriousness."

Director Woody Allen attends a press conference at the Cannes film festival in 2015.

Dustin Hoffman: In a guest column for The Hollywood Reporter on Nov. 1, writer Anna Graham Hunter described being groped and sexually propositioned repeatedly by Mr. Hoffman in 1985, when she was 17. The alleged harassment took place on the set of the TV movie Death of a Salesman, where she was interning as a production assistant in her senior year of high school. She kept a regular diary of the incidents and sent them to her sister, but had never publicly revealed the abuse until now. The Oscar-winning actor, now 80, responded with a statement of apology: "I am sorry. It is not reflective of who I am."

Steven Seagal: On Twitter, actress Portia de Rossi described an encounter with the action star where he "sat me down and unzipped his leather pants" when auditioning her for one of his films. Actresses Rae Dawn Chong and Jenny McCarthy have also alleged that auditions with Mr. Seagal turned into sexual harassment. Actress Julianna Margulies alleged that she once met Mr. Seagal at a hotel room where he had a gun, though she says she was not sexually assaulted or harmed: "I got out of there unscathed. … I don't know how I got out of that hotel room." Mr. Seagal has not commented publicly on the incidents.

Aziz Ansari: In an interview with the website Babe.net, a 23-year-old photographer alleged she was "taken advantage of" on a date last year with Mr. Ansari, a comedian and creator of the TV series Master of None. The woman, identified as "Grace" by the website, described the incident as "by far the worst experience with a man I've ever had." She said she texted Mr. Ansari the day after to tell her he made her uncomfortable, and he texted an apology back. In a Jan. 14 statement, Mr. Ansari said their sexual encounter "by all indications was completely consensual," and said he was "surprised and concerned" by her feelings.

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Aziz Ansari arrives at the 23rd annual Critics’ Choice Awards at the Barker Hangar in Santa Monica, Calif., on Jan. 11, 2018.

George Takei: The actor famous for portraying Hikaru Sulu on Star Trek was accused by a model, Scott Brunton, of having groped him in 1981. Mr. Takei denied the allegations and said the incident "simply did not occur."

March 15, 2016: George Takei attends a film premiere in Los Angeles.

Richard Dreyfuss: Los Angeles-based writer Jessica Teich told Vulture that Mr. Dreyfuss, star of such films as Jaws and Close Encounters of the Third Kind, harangued her with lewd comments in the 1980s when they worked together. She also said he once summoned her to his trailer, where he exposed himself: "his penis was out, and he sort of tried to draw me close to it." Mr. Dreyfuss denied exposing himself, but acknowledged flirting with her and said he thought the other encounters were a playful "consensual seduction ritual," adding that he was "horrified and bewildered to discover that it wasn't consensual."

January, 2015: Richard Dreyfuss poses for a portrait at the Village at the Lift during the 2015 Sundance Film Festival.

Andrew Kreisberg: Nineteen former and current employees of Warner Bros. Television group have accused Mr. Kreisberg, a showrunner on the shot-in-Canada superhero shows Supergirl, The Flash and Arrow, of sexual harassment. After an investigation, the network fired him. Mr. Kreisberg told Variety he's made comments on women's appearances and clothes in his capacity as an executive director, "but they were not sexualized."

Jeffrey Tambor: The star of the Amazon series Transparent will not be returning for a fifth season after two women, co-star Trace Lysette and former assistant Van Barnes, accused him of sexual harassment. In a Nov. 19 statement to Deadline, Mr. Tambor denied the allegations – "the idea that I would deliberately harass anyone is simply and utterly untrue" – but he said a "politicized atmosphere" on set made his role in the series untenable.

Nov. 2, 2017: Jeffrey Tambor speaks onstaged during the 2017 Clio Entertainment Awards in Los Angeles.

Charlie Sheen: A friend of Corey Haim, a Canadian actor who passed away in 2010, accused Mr. Sheen of having raped the former child star on the set of the 1986 film Lucas, when Mr. Haim was 13 and Mr. Sheen was 19. Former actor Dominick Brascia told The National Enquirer that Mr. Haim had confided in him about the incident. Mr. Sheen's lawyers denied the allegations.

Danny Masterson: The actor, known for playing Steven Hyde on That '70s Show, denies allegations from three women that he sexually assaulted them. Los Angeles police are investigating the claims, which emerged in March and which date back to the early 2000s. Netflix announced in December that it had written Mr. Masterson out of its comedy show The Ranch.

Jeremy Piven: The Emmy-winning actor is accused by actress Ariane Bellamar of having groped her on two occasions, one on the set of Entourage and another at the Playboy mansion. In a statement, Mr. Piven denied the allegations. CBS, the network producing his current show Wisdom of the Crowd, said it was "looking into the matter." A statement from HBO – the network behind Entourage, which ran for eight seasons featuring Mr. Piven – said "Everyone at HBO and our productions is aware that zero tolerance for sexual harassment is our policy."

Aug. 1, 2017: Jeremy Piven attends the CBS Summer Soiree in Studio City, Calif.

Ben Affleck: After the Weinstein revelations, actor-director Ben Affleck joined in the chorus of criticism against the patron behind his breakout film, Good Will Hunting. But when Mr. Affleck didn't say whether he had known about Mr. Weinstein's behaviour, actress Rose McGowan accused him of lying by omission, saying she had told him about the producer's treatment of women years ago. Actress Hillary Burton also spoke out about a 2003 incident where Mr. Affleck grabbed her breasts on the show Total Request Live. Mr. Affleck apologized for groping Ms. Burton.

Ben Affleck holds his award for best director for Argo during the 70th Annual Golden Globe Awards on Jan. 13, 2013.

Roy Price: The Amazon Studios chief, accused of harassing producer Isa Hackett, resigned in October. He was also accused of taking no action when an actress told him she was sexually assaulted by Mr. Weinstein.

David O. Russell: The Oscar-nominated director of movies such as Silver Linings Playbook and American Hustle has been accused of sexual harassment and abuse that dates back several years. Amazon also nixed the David O. Russell project because it was intended to be produced by The Weinstein Company. He has also admitted to groping his 19-year-old transgender niece but won't face charges.

James Franco: On Jan. 7, the American actor-director accepted a Golden Globe award wearing a "#TimesUp" pin denouncing sexual assault in the film industry, prompting several women on Twitter to allege past sexual misconduct by him. Actress Violet Paley said he once pushed her head down in a car toward his exposed genitals, tweeting later that that he had recently "offered me & a few other girls an overdue, annoyed, convenient phone 'apology'" that she did not accept. Asked about the allegations by TV host Stephen Colbert on Jan. 9, Mr. Franco said the claims on Twitter were "not accurate," and that if he's done something wrong he will fix it. "I'm here to listen and learn and change my perspective where it's off, and I'm completely willing and want to."

T.J. Miller: The American actor and standup comedian is accused of having sexually and physically assaulted a woman at George Washington University when they were students there in the early 2000s. Speaking with The Daily Beast, the woman, whom the website identified as "Sarah," said Mr. Miller violently shook her, punched her in the mouth during sex and choked her. The Daily Beast reported that it had corroborated details of Sarah's story with associates of both her and Mr. Miller, who, for his part, said they were "false accusations" that the woman resurfaced to "bandwagon" on the #MeToo movement.

Chris Savino: Nickelodeon fired the animator and showrunner of The Loud House after sexual harassment allegations from at least a dozen women surfaced. After being let go by the network he responded to the accusations by saying he was "deeply sorry" and "ashamed."

Oliver Stone: On Oct. 12, the director of Platoon and Natural Born Killers suggested people were rushing to judgment about Mr. Weinstein: "It's not easy what he's going through, either," Mr. Stone said at a film festival in South Korea. Actress Carrie Stephens responded by tweeting that Mr. Stone once groped her at a party. She later explained had taken place in the 1990s, near the time when his 1991 film JFK was released. "He just groped my boob and honked it like a horn and grinned and kept walking," she said. Mr. Stone later walked back his comments about Mr. Weinstein.

Sept. 9, 2016: Director Oliver Stone arrives on the red carpet for the film Snowden at the Toronto International Film Festival.

Andy Dick: The 51-year-old actor was fired from Raising Buchanan after being accused of sexual harassment during the filming of the movie. The allegations include sexual propositions, groping and non-consensual kissing and licking. He denies the groping but says he "might have kissed somebody on the cheek to say goodbye and then licked them. That's my thing."

Robert Knepper: Hollywood designer Susan Bertram says Mr. Knepper, an actor now known for playing Theodore (T-Bag) Bagwell on Prison Break, sexually assaulted her in 1992 during the filming of Gas Food Lodging. She told The Hollywood Reporter that he forced himself on her at his trailer, grabbed her crotch and shoved her against a wall, before she pushed him away and fled. Ms. Bertram is one of at least five women who have come forward alleging past sexual misconduct by Mr. Knepper, allegations that he denies. The allegations prompted an internal investigation by Warner Bros. TV, producers of the CW series iZombie, which decided to keep Mr. Knepper as a series regular after it found "no evidence of wrongdoing on the set of the show."

Morgan Spurlock: "I am part of the problem," the documentary filmmaker wrote in a Dec. 13 Twitter post where he described being accused of rape after a sexual encounter in college that he believed was consensual. He said the woman wrote about the incident in a short story and called him out by name, but "there were no charges or investigations." Mr. Spurlock also said he settled a sexual-harassment case with a female assistant eight years ago, and admitted to cheating on "every wife and girlfriend I have ever had." He said that "by recognizing and openly admitting what I've done to further this terrible situation, I hope to empower the change within myself."

Matthew Weiner: The creator of Mad Men has been accused of sexual harassment by a former writer who worked with him. Kater Gordon, who started out as Mr. Weiner's personal assistant, alleges that in 2009 he said she owed it to him to let him see her naked. Ms. Gordon, who won an Emmy Award for writing that year, was let go from the show a year later.

Ed Westwick: The actor best known for playing Chuck Bass on Gossip Girl has been accused of raping actress Kristina Cohen. The actress wrote in a Nov. 6 Facebook post that, three years earlier, while taking a nap in Mr. Westwick's guest bedroom, she awoke to him touching her and says that "he held me down and raped me." Police in Los Angeles launched an investigation of the allegations, which Mr. Westwick has denied. Days later, another rape accusation was levelled at him, this time from former actress Aurélie Wynn. She alleges that he attacked her in 2014 while she was sleeping. A third woman, Rachel Eck, accuses him of sexual assault, saying he "pulled me onto the bed and aggressively groped me,"at a Hollywood hotel in 2014.

Jan. 6, 2016: Ed Westwick arrives at the People’s Choice Awards in Los Angeles.

John Lasseter: Walt Disney Co. executive John Lasseter, who heads animation at both Disney and Pixar, told staff that he was taking a six-month leave of absence following what he called "missteps" including unwanted hugs that made employees uncomfortable. "It's never easy to face your missteps, but it's the only way to learn from them," the Pixar co-founder said in a memo, in which he apologized to employees who felt "disrespected or uncomfortable." Mr. Lasseter's decision to take a leave of absence follows a story published in The Hollywood Reporter on Nov. 21 that said some women at Disney had been made uncomfortable by physical contact initiated by the director of the 1995 hit Toy Story. Disney said in a statement that it appreciated Mr. Lasseter's "candor and sincere apology" and supported his leave of absence.

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Comedy and theatre

Albert Schultz: The co-founder of Toronto's Soulpepper Theatre Company is being sued separately by four actresses who allege he sexually harassed and assaulted them over the course of two decades, The Globe and Mail reported on Jan. 3. Mr. Schultz was ordered to step down and Soulpepper launched an internal investigation. "These claims make serious allegations against me which I do not take lightly," Mr. Schultz said in a statement. "I intend to vehemently defend myself." On Jan. 4, Mr. Schultz resigned from his post as artistic director at Soulpepper.

Albert Schultz, shown in 2013.

Louis C.K.: Five women have accused the comedian of sexual misconduct, according to The New York Times. Two say that he masturbated in front of them after a comedy show in 2002. Another said that in 2003 while she was inviting him to a show she could hear him masturbating as the phone call proceeded. Rumours of his inappropriate behaviour within the comedy world have circulated for years. The revelations scuttled the Nov. 17 release date of his film I Love You, Daddy, and HBO withdrew several of his programs from their on-demand services. In a Nov. 10 statement, Louis CK acknowledged that "these stories are true," expressing remorse for his actions and saying he would "now step back and take a long time to listen."

Aug. 9, 2017: Louis C.K. speaks at a panel in Beverly Hills, Calif.

Gilbert Rozon: The president of Montreal's Just For Laughs festival resigned on Oct. 18 after newspaper Le Devoir and radio station 98.5 FM jointly reported on accusations on predatory sexual behaviour from nine women. More women came forward later, including TV star Julie Snyder, who cut her production company's ties with Just For Laughs. Mr. Rozon, who does not face any charges, didn't address the allegations publicly until February, saying "I never had sex with anyone against their will." He also announced he would sell his majority shares in Just for Laughs.

Gilbert Rozon, shown on March 12, 2017.

Max Stafford-Clark: In Britain, Max Stafford-Clark, one of the country's most influential theatre directors, faced new allegations about sexual harassment in the wake of the Weinstein affair. On Oct. 20, the Guardian newspaper reported that he had been forced to leave his Out of Joint theatre company in September because of lewd comments to an employee. Actress Tracy Ann Oberman and two other women then told The Guardian he had made sexual comments to them in the 1980s and 1990s.

Peter Martins: The 71-year-old leader of the New York City Ballet retired in January amid allegations of sexual harassment and physical/verbal abuse. Mr. Martins denies having sexually harassed members of the company, and told its board of directors in a Jan. 1 letter that the scandal has "exacted a painful toll on me and my family."

Israel Horovitz: The 78-year-old American playwright is accused by nine women of sexual misconduct, including forced kisses and groping. Mr. Horovitz told The New York Times he remembered some of those incidents differently than the women described, but "I apologize with all my heart to any woman who has ever felt compromised by my actions." Several theatre companies have severed ties with him or cancelled productions of his plays.

Sept. 9, 2014: Israel Horovitz attends the premiere of My Old Lady in New York.

Laszlo Marton: In his native Hungary, the award-winning theatre director has stepped away from several of his roles this fall after accusations of sexual harassment by 10 women who worked with him. Toronto's Soulpepper Theatre, where he once worked as a guest artist and "master teacher," revealed on Oct. 30 that they cut ties with him in 2016 because of two such complaints.

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Music

Charles Dutoit: The renowned orchestra conductor is accused of sexual misconduct by several women, ranging from thrusting his tongue into their mouths and physically restraining them. Allegations reported by Associated Press on Dec. 2, came from three opera singers and a classical musician, who spoke in separate interviews with the news agency. The Montreal Symphony Orchestra, where Mr. Dutoit was artistic director from the late 1970s to early 2000s, also confirmed that it had received a sexual harassment complaint against him, and that it would be investigated by an independent third party. Mr. Dutoit, 81, denies the allegations.

Oct. 19, 2011: Conductor Charles Dutoit, right, performs with the Philadelphia Orchestra.

Russell Simmons: The music producer and founder of Def Jam Recordings stepped aside from his various companies on Nov. 30, soon after he was accused of sexual assault and harassment by screenwriter Jenny Lumet. In a guest column for The Hollywood Reporter, Ms. Lumet said he forced her to have sex with him in 1991. Mr. Simmons responded that he remembered that evening differently, but "it is now clear to me that her feelings of fear and intimidation are real." Mr. Simmons had been accused of sexual assault earlier by a model, Keri Claussen Khalighi, who told the Los Angeles Times that in 1991 he coerced her to perform oral sex while filmmaker Brett Ratner (more on him in the "Film and TV" section of this explainer) "just sat there and watched." She was 17 at the time.

In this Feb. 6, 2015, file photo, Russell Simmons presents at the 46th NAACP Image Awards in Pasadena, Calif.

Nick Carter: The singer, best known for his time with the boy band the Backstreet Boys, was accused of raping pop singer Melissa Schuman 15 years ago. Ms. Schuman, one of the members of the girl group Dream, detailed in a blog post in early November that she was "forced to engage in an act against my will" when she was 18 and Mr. Carter was 22. In a statement on Nov. 22, Mr. Carter said he was "shocked and saddened" by Ms. Schuman's allegations and that "Melissa never expressed to me while we were together or at any time since that anything we did was not consensual." Mr. Carter added that "it is contrary to my nature and everything I hold dear to intentionally cause someone discomfort or harm."

July 9, 2017: Nick Carter of the Backstreet Boys performs in Quebec City.

Alex Calder: The Montreal musician, who once played in Canadian indie darling Mac DeMarco's old band, was dropped by his label Captured Tracks after a sexual-assault allegation, which he admitted in a statement "constituted assault."

James Levine: On Dec. 3, New York's Metropolitan Opera suspended the long-time conductor as it investigates multiple claims of sexual misconduct dating from the late 1960s to the 1980s. Several men told The New York Times of sexual encounters with Mr. Levine, now 74, when they were teenagers.

July 7, 2006: James Levine conducts the Boston Symphony Orchestra.

Ethan Kath: Former Crystal Castles bandmate Alice Glass accused Claudio Palmieri, stage name Ethan Kath, of non-consensual sex as well as physical and emotional abuse that began when she was 15 and he was 25. The Canadian group's tour dates have since been cancelled.

R. Kelly: Accusations of the R&B superstar having sex with underage girls date back years. In 2002, Mr. Kelly was charged with multiple counts of child pornography (he was later acquitted). This past July, BuzzFeed reported that Mr. Kelly runs an abusive "cult" where he controls the lives of numerous women. Then this month another woman stepped forward with further abuse allegations.

R&B singer R. Kelly performs at New York’s Radio City Music Hall on April 18, 2006.

The Gaslamp Killer: The hip-hop producer and DJ, whose real name is William Bensussen, was accused of drugging and raping two women. The Low End Theory DJ showcase subsequently cut ties with Mr. Bensussen and his tour dates were cancelled.

Matt Mondanile: This month, the indie rock band Real Estate said they fired Mr. Mondanile in 2016 following "allegations of unacceptable treatment of women." Since then, multiple women accused Mr. Mondanile of sexual misconduct. His recent shows have been cancelled.

Twiggy Ramirez: A former bassist for the bands A Perfect Circle and Nine Inch Nails, Jeordie White, who also went by the stage name Twiggy Ramirez, was fired from Marilyn Manson's band on Oct. 24 after Jack Off Jill singer Jessicka Addams accused him of raping her.

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Sports

Lawrence Nassar: A former U.S. Olympic team doctor pleaded guilty to seven counts of sexual assault in Michigan for allegedly molesting gymnasts under the pretext of medical treatment. On Jan. 24, he was sentenced to 175 years in prison. Notable accusers incude Aly Raisman, a gymnast with the 2012 and 2016 U.S. Olympic teams who spoke in her book and in TV interviews about being abused, and Olympic gold medalist Simone Biles, who wrote that the abuse left her broken and the more she tried to "shut off the voice in my head the louder it screams."

Jerry Richardson: The owner of the Carolina Panthers football team came under an internal investigation for workplace misconduct, which was later taken over by the National Football League. Neither the team nor the league have explained the nature of the alleged misconduct, but Sports Illustrated magazine reported on Dec. 17 that at least four former Panthers employees got monetary settlements over Mr. Richardson's behaviour, which included sexual harassment and a racial slur. Mr. Richardson announced Dec. 17 that he would be selling the franchise at the end of this season.

Jan. 24, 2016: Carolina Panthers owner Jerry Richardson watches before the NFC Championship game against the Arizona Cardinals in Charlotte, N.C.

NFL network analysts: In December, the NFL Network suspended three of its analysts – Heath Evans, Marshall Faulk and Ike Taylor – after a lawsuit by a former wardrobe stylist, Jami Cantor, alleged sexual harassment and assault by the three former NFL players, as well as two men who have since left the network, analyst Donovan McNabb and former executive producer Eric Weinberger. The allegations range from invasive questions about her sex life from Mr. Faulk, being sent a video of Mr. Taylor masturbating in the shower and being asked by Mr. Weinberger to touch his crotch.

Michel Arsenault: Gymnastics Canada suspended the Edmonton-based coach after allegations surfaced that he sexually abused gymnasts in the 1980s and 1990s. CBC/Radio-Canada first reported the story and according to a former colleague he began asking the gymnasts, who were generally from the ages of 12 to 16, sexually suggestive questions. Several women also came forward and accused him of sexual assault, alleging that the inappropriate behaviour occurred when they were minors.

Sepp Blatter: The former FIFA president allegedly groped U.S. soccer star Hope Solo. Ms. Solo accuses him of grabbing her rear end at the 2013 Ballon d'Or awards ceremony. She alleges that the incident happened before the two appeared onstage together at the annual event honouring the best in the soccer. Mr. Blatter, who has been criticized in the past of making sexist remarks about women in soccer, responded by saying "this allegation is ridiculous."

In this Jan. 7, 2013, file photo, Abby Wambach is presented the FIFA Women’s World Player of the Year award by Hope Solo and FIFA President Sepp Blatter.

Gregg Zaun: Sportsnet terminated its contract with the former Toronto Blue Jays catcher, a long-time baseball analyst for the network, after receiving "complaints from multiple female employees at Sportsnet regarding inappropriate behaviour" in the workplace, according to a statement. Mr. Zaun apologized days after the allegations broke, saying in a statement issued by his lawyer that he had done a lot of "soul searching" and accepted responsibility for "the harm caused by my language."

Gregg Zaun, shown in 2010.

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Food

Mario Batali: The American celebrity restauranteur stepped away from the day-to-day operations of his business empire – and his ABC cooking show, The Chew – after a report from the news website Eater New York in which four women accused him of touching them inappropriately. Mr. Batali said in a prepared statement that the complaints "match up" with his past behaviour, and "I take full responsibility and am deeply sorry for any pain, humiliation or discomfort I have caused to my peers, employees, customers, friends and family."

Oct. 17, 2016: Mario Batali previews the meal for a state dinner with Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi.

Ken Friedman: The proprietor of the tony New York restaurant The Spotted Pig is accused by several former employees of unwanted sexual advances. Ten women who spoke with The New York Times described public gropings, demands for nude pictures and late-night private parties where guests had sex in public and sexually harassed the staff. Mr. Friedman told The Times: "Some incidents were not as described, but context and content are not today's discussion. I apologize now publicly for my actions."

John Besh: More than two dozen current and former female employees of the restaurant company he founded accused the celebrity chef of sexual harassment and fostering a hostile work environment. He stepped down from "all aspects of operations" in order to "provide his full focus on his family."

Chef John Besh, shown in 2015.

Matt Carmichael: The chef behind popular Ottawa restaurants Riviera, Datsun and El Camino admitted to sexually harassing three women. His admission came shortly after the Ottawa Citizen contacted him about the claims. Mr. Carmichael has stepped away from business operations at the restaurants but it's not clear if he's leaving them altogether.

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News media and publishing

Andrew Creighton and Mike Germano: Vice Media suspended its president and chief digital officer as it investigates sexual-harassment claims against them, the company told employees in a Jan. 2 memo. A December New York Times investigation explored how a "boundary-pushing culture created a workplace that was degrading and uncomfortable for women" at the media company, and said four settlements had been reached involving sexual harassment or defamation against Vice employees, including Mr. Creighton. Vice co-founders Shane Smith and Suroosh Alvi have apologized for the "boy's club" culture of the Canadian-born media empire they built.

Matt Lauer: On Nov. 29, NBC fired the Today Show host after a complaint of "inappropriate sexual behaviour" by a colleague. While the network said this was the first such complaint they had heard about him, "we were also presented with reason to believe this may not have been an isolated incident," according to an internal company statement read out on the Today Show by co-anchor Savannah Guthrie.

Sept. 9, 2016: Matt Lauer looks on during the NBC News Commander-in-Chief Forum in New York during the U.S. election.

Charlie Rose: Eight women told The Washington Post that the longtime TV broadcaster and host of The Charlie Rose Show sexually assaulted them. The allegations, which span from the late 1990s to 2011, include accounts of Mr. Rose groping women and walking around naked in their presence. PBS and Bloomberg responded by suspending distribution of The Charlie Rose Show, an interview series that has been on the air since 1991. CBS fired Mr. Rose, who co-hosted a morning show on the network. In a statement, Mr. Rose apologized for his "inappropriate behaviour," but added, "I do not believe that all of these allegations are accurate."

April 25, 2017: TV host Charlie Rose arrives for the Time 100 Gala in New York.

Ryan Lizza: The New Yorker's Washington correspondent was fired on Dec. 11 for what the magazine called "improper sexual conduct." The female accuser wishes to remain anonymous, according to a statement from the law firm representing her. In a statement, Mr. Lizza denied the claims, saying the decision to fire him "was made hastily and without a full investigation of the relevant facts." CNN, where Mr. Lizza was a commentator, said he would not appear on the network while the matter was being investigated.

Mario Testino: On Jan. 13, The New York Times reported that 13 male assistants and models had accused the celebrity photographer of unwanted sexual advances and coercion going back to the 1990s. Former assistants said Mr. Testino had a pattern of hiring young, heterosexual men and subjecting them to increasingly aggressive behaviour including groping them and masturbating in front of them. A law firm representing Mr. Testino dismissed the allegations. Condé Nast, publisher of Vogue magazine and other publications that featured Mr. Testino's work, said it would stop working with him for now.

Bruce Weber: In the Times report cited above, 15 current and former male models said the celebrity photographer Bruce Weber made unwanted sexual advances during photo shoots and other private sessions. Models were asked to "breathe" and to touch themselves and Mr. Weber, moving their hands wherever they felt "energy," the newspaper said. "I'm completely shocked and saddened by the outrageous claims being made against me, which I absolutely deny," Mr. Weber said in a statement from his lawyer. Condé Nast said it would stop working with Mr. Weber for now.

Garrison Keillor: Minnesota Public Radio – home for four decades to Mr. Keillor's variety program A Prairie Home Companion – fired him over a single allegation of "inappropriate behaviour." The program, which Mr. Keillor retired from in 2016, will be renamed Town Hall to distance itself from its creator. The 75-year-old author told the Minneapolis Star-Tribune that he was fired for having put his hand on a woman's exposed back while trying to console her: "I meant to pat her back after she told me about her unhappiness, and her shirt was open and my hand went up it about six inches." Mr. Keillor told the Star-Tribune that he apologized and he accepted her apology, and "we continued to be friendly right up until her lawyer called."

July 26, 2017: Garrison Keillor speaks in his St. Paul, Minn., office.

Mark Halperin: U.S. networks NBC and MSNBC suspended Mr. Halperin, a political journalist, after CNN reported on allegations that he had sexually harassed women at a previous job at ABC News. He issued a statement saying that he was "profoundly sorry for the pain and anguish" he caused while at ABC. He also said he sought counselling after leaving the network and did not continue his behaviour in later positions but another accuser, who was in university at the time, has come forward saying he allegedly harassed her after leaving his role at ABC.

Mark Halperin, shown in 2016.

Knight Landesman: The publisher of New York art magazine Artforum resigned on Oct. 25, the same day a former employee filed a lawsuit accusing him of sexually harassing her for years. The magazine's other publishers issued a statement saying Mr. Landesman had "engaged in unacceptable behaviour and caused a hostile work environment."

Knight Landesman attends an art exhibition opening in New York on Dec. 16, 2011.

Bill O'Reilly: The Fox News commentator's sexual-harassment history had been widely reported on before the Weinstein story broke. In April, a New York Times report that he had reached settlements with five different women led to his ouster from the network. But in October, the story gained new life when the Times reported on a sixth settlement for an even bigger sum – $32-million – with legal analyst Lis Wiehl, and that Fox had known about the settlement when they renewed his show The O'Reilly Factor a month later.

Fox News TV host Bill O’Reilly, shown in 2015.

Terry Richardson: Condé Nast, the media giant in charge of publishing Vogue, Vanity Fair and GQ, cut ties with the photographer on Oct. 23. The allegations of sexual harassment date back to at least 2010. Several women accuse him of propositioning them for sex and inappropriate touching without their consent. He denied the allegations in 2014 and called the situation "an emotionally-charged witch hunt."

Éric Salvail: The well-known Québécois media personality, host of the talk show En mode Salvail, took leave from professional work after La Presse reported on allegations of sexual harassment from some 11 people. The Montreal police is reported to have received three formal complaints. Mr. Salvail's show has been cancelled and employees at his production company laid off.

Éric Salvail holds up his trophy for best variety show host at the Artis television gala in Montreal on April 29, 2007.

Michel Venne: A former political reporter for the newspaper Le Devoir, he was until this spring executive director of the Institut du Nouveau Monde, an organization promoting citizen participation in democratic life. On Oct. 26, a former employee, Léa Clermont-Dion, said on her Facebook page that she had filed a complaint with police, alleging that Mr. Venne sexually assaulted her in 2008 when she was 17. She also alleged that, when she first alluded to the incident in 2014-15, the former Parti Québécois cabinet minister Lise Payette urged Ms. Clermont-Dion to retract her allegations because it had hurt Mr. Venne's bid to become Le Devoir's publisher. Two other former employees also made allegations of sexual misconduct against him. Mr. Venne denied the allegations.

Andy Signore: The senior vice-president of Defy Media was fired after being accused of sexual harassment by several women. The company owns Screen Junkies, an online publication focused on film and TV.

Glenn Thrush: The New York Times temporarily suspended Mr. Thrush, a star reporter in the newspaper's Washington bureau, after an old colleague of his from the news website Politico wrote that he had kissed her inappropriately at a bar five years ago, then spread stories afterward blaming her for the incident. Laura McGann's report for Vox also cited similar incidents with other women, including a 23-year-old who said Mr. Thrush positioned himself as "an advocate for women and women journalists," but then sexually harassed her at a party this past June. Mr. Thrush apologized for the June incident, but said the encounter with Ms. McGann was "brief, consensual and ended by me." After an internal investigation, the Times reinstated Mr. Thrush but removed him from the White House beat.

Journalist Glenn Thrush records an episode of The Press Pool at Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio.

Lockhart Steele: Vox Media fired its editorial director after allegations were raised in an ex-employee's post on the publishing platform Medium. Mr. Steele was also the founder of Curbed Network, a series of digital media properties acquired by Vox in 2013 that covered everything from real estate to retail.

Matt Taibbi: Sexual-harassment allegations have surrounded Mr. Taibbi, currently a Rolling Stone journalist, since his 2000 memoir The eXile: Sex Drugs and Libel in the New Russia apparently described mistreatment and sexual assault of female employees at the English-language newspaper in Russia that he co-edited. After the Weinstein affair, the controversy came back to life when an NPR journalist asked Mr. Taibbi about the memoir, and he has cancelled some promotional events for his new book. Mr. Taibbi and the memoir' co-writer, former eXile co-editor Mark Ames, claim that the passages were satirical, though in a Facebook post Mr. Taibbi apologized for using "cruel and misogynistic language."

Jann Wenner: The Rolling Stone founder has been accused of sexual harassment by a freelance writer who sought to work for the publication. Ben Ryan alleges that he was offered a contract by Mr. Wenner in exchange for sex. According to BuzzFeed News, which first reported the story, Mr. Wenner acknowledged the encounter but said that "there was no quid pro quo."

Michael Oreskes: NPR's senior vice president of news has resigned from his role after being accused of sexual harassment. In an internal memo, he said he was "deeply sorry to the people I hurt," and that he accepts "full responsibility" for his behaviour. The Washington Post reported that he made sexual advances to two women who were interviewing for a job at The New York Times while he was the paper's Washington Bureau Chief.

Hamilton Fish: The New Republic's president and publisher resigned following complaints of sexual harassment by several female employees. "It's my sense that our office culture has been harmed, and the best way for me to help the organization move past this is by withdrawing," he wrote in a letter to the magazine's owner Win McCormack. An internal investigation within the company will continue, Mr. McCormack said.

Leon Wieseltier: The former literary editor of the New Republic was fired from his forthcoming project, titled the Emerson Collective, after the magazine learned of "past inappropriate workplace conduct." He admitted to "misdeeds" that left female colleagues feeling "demeaned" and apologized for his behaviour.

New Republic literary editor Leon Wieseltier, shown in 2013.

Steve Paikin: The veteran Ontario broadcaster and host of TVO's The Agenda is accused by Sarah Thompson of having sexually propositioned her in 2010, when she was a candidate in the Toronto mayoral election. The network launched a third-party investigation of Ms. Thompson's claims, but CEO Lisa de Wilde said they would not take him off the air. Mr. Paikin said in a Feb. 6 Facebook post that the allegations were "complete fiction" and that he would defend his reputation.

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Academia

Tariq Ramadan: Two French women have accused the well-known Islamic scholar of sexual assault. The allegations relate to two incidents, one in 2012 and the other in 2009. Mr. Ramadan teaches at Oxford University and has denied wrongdoing. His lawyer says that he intends to pursue defamation charges against the woman who brought forth the first allegation.

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Technology

Robert Scoble: The tech blogger and co-founder of an augmented reality company (Transformation Group) resigned from his position after being accused of sexual harassment. He said he was "deeply sorry to the people I've caused pain to."

Steve Jurvetson: A prominent investor in Silicon Valley has resigned from the venture capital firm he helped found and that bore his name. He was a backer of Elon Musk's SpaceX and Tesla and sat on both companies' boards before being put on a leave of absence for both. He was accused of sexual harassment and was the target of an ongoing investigation within Draper Fisher Jurvetson. He has denied the accusations saying: "Let me be perfectly clear: no such allegations are true."

Morgan Marquis-Boire: A well-known figure in the cybersecurity industry, he is the subject of multiple sexual-assault allegations that date back several years. University of Toronto's Citizen Lab cut ties with him in October after being made aware of the allegations. Several women accuse him of drugging and sexually assaulting them and others accuse him of physical assault.

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Politics

Patrick Brown: The leader of the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party stepped down on Jan. 24 after being accused by two women of sexual misconduct, allegations he categorically denied. "These allegations are false. Every one of them." CTV News, which first reported the allegations, says the alleged incidents occurred while he was a federal MP. One woman initially said that she was still a high-school student when Mr. Brown asked her to perform oral sex on him, though she later said she was of legal drinking age, stressing that this didn't change the core of her allegations. Another woman, who reportedly worked in Mr. Brown's office, is accusing him of sexual assault.

Ontario Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown leaves Queen’s Park after a press conference in Toronto on Wednesday, January 24, 2018.

Rick Dykstra: The president of Ontario's Progressive Conservative Party stepped down on Jan. 28, hours before a Maclean's magazine report detailed alleged sexual impropriety from his time as a Conservative MP. The magazine spoke with a young Conservative staffer who, in 2014, reported to Ottawa police that Mr. Dykstra had sexually assaulted her after a party on federal budget night. Maclean's also reported that senior Tory campaign operatives considered dropping Mr. Dykstra from the 2015 election when they learned of the allegations; he ended up running, but lost his riding. The Maclean's revelations prompted tough questions within the party about why Mr. Dykstra was allowed to run. Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer ordered a third-party investigation of the matter.

Sept. 20, 2012: Conservative MP Rick Dykstra speaks during Question Period in the House of Commons.

Kent Hehr: Canada's minister for sport and disabilities resigned from cabinet on Jan. 25 after being accused of sexual harassment. "I was told to avoid being in [an] elevator with Kent Hehr. He would make comments. He would make you feel unsafe," Kristin Raworth, an Alberta public servant, said on Twitter. Mr. Hehr has decided to remain in his role as MP for Calgary Centre and the Prime Minister said that the situation will be investigated. The allegations that were levelled against him refer to his time in the Alberta provincial legislature. Mr. Hehr did not comment on the specific allegations but said in a statement that harassment "is never acceptable."

Kent Hehr, Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities, during Question Period in the House of Commons in Ottawa, Dec. 7, 2017.

Jamie Baillie: The leader of the Nova Scotia Progressive Conservative Party announced that he was resigning his seat in the province's legislature via Twitter, citing "personal reasons." Hours later, the party said it requested Mr. Baillie's resignation following a an investigation by a third-party that found he had breached workplace harassment policies. In a statement, the party said that it "does not, and will not, tolerate sexual harassment in the workplace."

May 8, 2017: Nova Scotia Progressive Conservative leader Jamie Baillie makes a campaign stop in Lower Sackville, N.S.

Peter Stoffer: A former NDP MP faces allegations from several women who worked with him and say he touched or kissed them inappropriately over the years. The complainants include Lauren Dobson-Hughes, a former NDP staffer who told the National Post Mr. Stoffer grabbed and kissed her without consent on two occasions in 2006 and 2009. Mr. Stoffer, who lost his House seat in the 2015 election, gave a series of public apologies after the allegations surfaced: "If there is any man or any woman that at any time felt uncomfortable … because of my demeanour in any way shape or form, for that I apologize and I humbly regret that I put them in that type of situation."

Peter Stoffer speaks from his office in Fall River, N.S., on Sept. 20, 2010.

Steve Wynn: In January, The Wall Street Journal reported that Mr. Wynn – a billionaire casino mogul hired as finance chairman for the Republican National Committee by his onetime business rival, Donald Trump – was accused of sexual misconduct in his workplace by dozens of people. Mr. Wynn, 76, denied the allegations, telling The Wall Street Journal: "The idea that I ever assaulted any woman is preposterous." He has resigned from his position as RNC finance chairman.

Roy Moore: A Republican Senate candidate in Alabama was accused of making inappropriate sexual advances and engaging in sexual contact with at least seven women. The alleged incidents go as far back as the 1970s, when Mr. Moore was a lawyer in his 30s. Most of the women were only teenagers at the time. Mr. Moore, now 70, denied the allegations throughout the campaign, which he lost on Dec. 12 in a surprise upset to Democratic candidate Doug Jones. U.S. President Donald Trump (more on him later) dismissed the allegations surrounding Mr. Moore and offered him his full support in the Alabama campaign, though after Mr. Moore lost, the President tried to distance himself from the candidate somewhat.

Nov. 14, 2017: Judge Roy Moore, a Republican candidate for U.S. Senate, speaks during a campaign event in Jackson, Ala.

Al Franken: The Democrat senator and former comedian announced he would resign after accusations of sexual harassment by several women and calls from his fellow senators to step aside. Controversy first emerged after Leeann Tweeden, a sports broadcaster and model, accused him of having groped her in 2006 when the two were performing on a USO tour in Afghanistan and the Middle East. Ms. Tweeden also posted a photo of Mr. Franken touching her breasts through a flak vest, saying he did this while she was asleep during the flight home from Afghanistan. Within weeks, at least seven other accuers came forward. Mr. Franken issued a series of apologies but said he remembered some of the incidents differently.

Jan. 4, 2006: Al Franken laughs during an interview with Associated Press in Minneapolis.

John Conyers: A report from Buzzfeed unearthed multiple allegations of sexual harassment against the 88-year-old Democratic congressman from Michigan. Mr. Conyers reached a $27,000 settlement in 2015 with a former staffer who said she was fired for refusing his sexual advances, and others said they had seen him touching female staffers inappropriately, according to court documents obtained by Buzzfeed from a conservative activist but verified independently. The U.S. House Ethics committee launched an investigation into the allegations on Nov. 21, which Mr. Conyers said he would full co-operate in. Weeks later, Mr. Conyers resigned from Congress, though he continued to deny the allegations.

Feb. 14, 2017, Rep. John Conyers attends a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Dan Johnson: A Republican state lawmaker in Kentucky died of an apparent suicide on Dec. 13, days after a report alleging he had sexually assaulted a teenage girl in 2013. Mr. Johnson, also the pastor of a Louisville church, denied the allegation, which was one of several claims of sexual misconduct against Republican politicians in the state.

Minnesota lawmakers: Two legislators in Minnesota, a Republican House member and a Democrat senator, are under fire for alleged sexual misconduct. A female lobbyist told the Minneapolis Star Tribune that Mr. Cornish propositioned her multiple times and once forced himself on her. Another Republican legislator, Erin Maye Quade, shared text messages with the Star Tribune in which Mr. Cornish admitted to ogling her in the legislature. Meanwhile, Democrat Senator Dan Schoen is facing pressure from his party colleagues to resign over allegations that he sexually harassed women on the campaign trail. Mr. Schoen says the allegations are false.

Corey Lewandowski: Mr. Trump's former campaign manager faces a sex-assault complaint from singer and potential congressional candidate Joy villa, who alleges that he hit her "extremely hard" on the buttocks at a Washington event in November. Mr. Lewandowski has not responded to the allegations.

Mark Garnier: A minister in Britain's Department for International Trade was put under investigation for asking his secretary to buy sex toys in 2010, though a cabinet inquiry later cleared him of wrongdoing. Mr. Garnier acknowledged the incident but said it was "hijinks," not sexual harassment. He was one of several in Britain's political establishment to come under scrutiny over bad behaviour in the legislature, including Damian Green, a cabinet member who essentially serves as the country's deputy prime minister.

Michael Fallon: Britain's defence minister resigned after being accused of inappropriate sexual behaviour. A report in the Sun newspaper alleged that, at an event in 2002, he repeatedly touched a female journalist on the knee. Mr. Fallon has been a member of Parliament since 1983 and was in his most recent role since 2014. In his resignation letter to British Prime Minister Theresa May, he said his actions "may have fallen below the high standards that we require of the Armed Forces."

Bill Clinton: Sex-assault cases involving the former president got renewed attention during the 2016 U.S. election, when his wife, Hillary, was running against a Republican candidate accused of rape by multiple women (more on that below). But the Weinstein affair has also revived discussion of Mr. Clinton's record. His accusers include Juanita Broaddrick, who in 1999 alleged that Mr. Clinton had raped her in 1978, when he was Arkansas attorney-general and she worked at a nursing home; Paula Jones, a former Arkansas state employee who sued Mr. Clinton for sexual harassment in 1994, saying he exposed his penis to her and demanded oral sex; and Kathleen Willey, a former White House staffer who alleged in 1998 that he had groped her in the Oval Office five years earlier. Speaking of the #MeToo movement to Fox News in November, Ms. Jones and Ms. Broaddrick said the post-Weinstein reckoning on sexual assault is coming too late for them: "This great epiphany should have occurred 20 years ago," said Ms. Broaddrick, who settled out of court with Mr. Clinton for $850,000 (U.S.). "I should feel ecstatic, but I don't."

Oct. 3, 2017: Former U.S. president Bill Clinton speaks in Toronto.

George H.W. Bush: Actress Heather Lind accused the 93-year-old former Republican president of touching her from behind and making an obscene joke in Houston in 2014, when she was posing for a photo with him at a promotional event for her TV show. Several more women came forward with similar stories: Actress Jordana Grolnick told Deadspin described being groped in front of Mr. Bush's wife, Barbara, and being told his favourite magician was "David Cop-a-Feel." Roslyn Corrigan, the daughter of an intelligence analyst, told Time magazine she attended a 2003 gathering of CIA officers in Texas where Mr. Bush allegedly grabbed her buttocks. She was 16 at the time.

U.S. president George H.W. Bush conducts a press conference at the White House on Aug. 14, 1990.

Donald Trump: The U.S. President's alleged sexual abuse became a major part of the 2016 election, triggered mostly by the infamous Access Hollywood tape, a 2005 recording in which he described grabbing women by the genitals and being able to "do anything" to them. The tape refocused attention on earlier accounts by beauty-pageant contestants who said Mr. Trump harassed them, as well as a court deposition by his ex-wife, Ivana, who said he had assaulted her in 1989. More women – a Canadian journalist, a contestant on his reality show Celebrity Apprentice, women he met at public events and functions at his Florida mansion – spoke out during the campaign about his sexual advances. After the Weinstein scandal, many of Mr. Trump's accusers have openly wondered why there wasn't a similar effect on the man now sitting in the Oval Office. But the White House continued to assert that the women were not telling the truth, and Mr. Trump even questioned whether the Access Hollywood tape was genuine.

U.S. President Donald Trump, shown on Oct. 25, 2017, in Dallas.

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Compiled by Globe staff

With reports from Tu Thanh Ha, J. Kelly Nestruck, Evan Annett, Mayaz Alam, Arik Ligeti, Kristene Quan, Associated Press, Reuters, The Canadian Press and The New York Times News Service


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