Skip to main content

Hustlers

Barbara Nitke/Courtesy of Elevation Pictures

  • Directed by Lorena Scafaria
  • Written by Lorena Scafaria, based on the magazine article by Jessica Pressler
  • Starring Constance Wu, Jennifer Lopez and Julia Stiles
  • Classification R; 109 minutes

rating

More Goodfellas than Showgirls, writer-director Lorena Scafaria’s latest feature is a masterful example of knowing how to reel in one’s audience while commanding they stay for more. Hustlers is an ambitious film, one that seeks to balance its crime narrative with sharp comedy, and its slick marketing veneer with storytelling depth, all while housing a powerhouse bill of female actors whose presence together is already larger than life. (Opens Sept. 13)

Official Secrets

Courtesy of Entertainment One

  • Directed by Gavin Hood
  • Written by Gregory Bernstein, Sara Bernstein and Gavin Hood (based on The Spy Who Tried to Stop a War, by Marcia Mitchell and Thomas Mitchell)
  • Starring Keira Knightley, Matt Smith, Matthew Goode, Adam Bakri, Indira Varma, Rhys Ifans and Ralph Fiennes
  • Classification 14A; 112 minutes

rating

In the brooding docu-thriller Official Secrets, Keira Knightley portrays Katharine Gun, a British intelligence translator who leaked top-secret information concerning international arm-twisting by the United States in its hell-bent push for the invasion of Iraq in 2003. The film’s trailer suggests a level of suspense the film itself fails to deliver, as this well-acted political drama plays out in the open. (Opens Sept. 13)

Super Size Me 2: Holy Chicken!

The Canadian Press

  • Directed by Morgan Spurlock
  • Written by Morgan Spurlock and Jeremy Chilnick
  • Classification PG; 93 minutes

rating

In the original Super Size Me, Morgan Spurlock spent a month eating nothing but Big Macs, Quarter Pounders and fries (so many fries) in a gonzo experiment that explored the rise of obesity and the power of the fast-food industry. In Super Size Me 2: Holy Chicken!, Spurlock does a 180 and actually opens a fast-food restaurant of his own – a chicken-sandwich joint on the outskirts of Columbus, Ohio. The sequel explores the changes implemented by the fast-food industry since Super Size Me, but his main target is “Big Chicken,” which has surpassed beef as America’s favourite flesh. (Now available digitally)

Story continues below advertisement

Freaks

Freak Productions Inc.

  • Written and directed by Zach Lipovsky and Adam B. Stein
  • Starring Emile Hirsch, Bruce Dern and Lexy Kolker
  • Classification R; 104 minutes

rating

Writers-directors-producers Zach Lipovsky and Adam B. Stein’s latest film, Freaks, is one of several releases in the past decade that toys with the truth of its source of violence. Here, a seven-year-old girl named Chloe (Lexy Kolker) has been kept locked inside her house for years by her seemingly paranoid and overprotective father (Emile Hirsch). Without spoiling the film for new viewers, the twist here in regard to what is and what isn’t real comes somewhat earlier than it should, in as much as the story that follows its reveal can’t quite carry itself without its previous narrative devices. (Opens Sept. 13)

The Goldfinch

Nicole Rivelli/The Associated Press

  • Directed by John Crowley
  • Written by Peter Straughan
  • Starring Ansel Elgort, Nicole Kidman and Jeffrey Wright
  • Classification R; 149 minutes

rating

Turning author Donna Tartt’s polarizing 2013 Pulitzer Prize-winner into a film was never going to be easy – the novel is 784 pages of wild coming-of-age Dickensian tragedy and pop-outrageousness, spread across decades and continents. But it didn’t have to be so frustratingly difficult, either. Telling the up-and-down life story of New York antique dealer Theo (Ansel Elgort as a young man, Oakes Fegley as a boy), whose mother was killed in a museum bombing, The Goldfinch gets the momentum of Tartt’s work all wrong. (Opens Sept. 13)

This weekly guide was complied by Lori Fazari, from reviews by Sarah-Tai Black, Barry Hertz, Mark Medley and Brad Wheeler.

Report an error Editorial code of conduct
Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

To view this site properly, enable cookies in your browser. Read our privacy policy to learn more.
How to enable cookies