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Assault charges have been withdrawn against Saskatchewan MLA Nadine Wilson.

Michael Bell/The Canadian Press

Two assault charges have been withdrawn against a Saskatchewan member of the legislature.

A statement from the lawyer representing Nadine Wilson confirms the charges were withdrawn in Saskatoon court on Wednesday.

Her lawyer, Mark Brayford, said the case was referred to an alternative measures program for mediation and it was successfully completed.

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Details of the mediation meeting are subject to a confidentiality agreement.

The province said Wilson had no comment.

Wilson, first elected to represent Saskatchewan Rivers for the Saskatchewan Party in 2007, stepped down from her cabinet role as provincial secretary in July because of the charges.

The charges stemmed from a family dispute back in March when Wilson is alleged to have forcefully entered the apartment of her late father and his wife Lorraine Kingsley Helbig, who was 87 at the time.

Catherine Heinz alleged her elderly mother was knocked into a table by a door and that Wilson also assaulted her brother.

Heinz, who was at the mediation, said her family was not consulted about going through the alternative measures process and initially felt frustrated.

But she said preparing for the mediation helped in their healing.

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“We were exhausted but we were exhilarated because we were able to get a lot of pain and suffering off our chest,” she told The Canadian Press.

Saskatchewan’s Ministry of Justice says alternative measures programs give people who are accused of a crime a chance to make reparations to victims and the community. It also gives them a chance to take responsibility and address harm done to others.

“Being able to do that gave us a voice,” said Heinz.

Premier Scott Moe was criticized by the Saskatchewan Opposition NDP for allowing Wilson to stay in the Saskatchewan Party caucus after the charges against her were laid.

Moe said at the time that Wilson had maintained her innocence and the dispute stemmed from a private family matter.

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