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News Photo Archive

Explore a remarkable collection of 20th-century print photography to discover the people and events that shaped your history.
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I WAS BORN IN

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ROYAL FAMILY GREAT BRITAIN QUEEN ELIZABETH, QUEEN MOTHER PASSED BY THE CENSOR - NO. 168971 THE QUEEN PRESENTS COLOURS TO THE SASKATOON LIGHT INFANTRY, NOW IN ENGLAND. THE COLOURS WERE THE GIFT OF CITIZENS OF SASKATOON, CANADA. ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOTO SHOWS: THE QUEEN PRESENTS COLOURS. 25/10/41 [1941] PLEASE NOTE: THIS IS A ROTA PICTURE AND OTHER AGENCIES HAVE THE SAME PICTURE FOR CIRCULATION

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AUGUST 14, 1945 -- VJ-DAY & END OF WORLD WAR II CELEBRATED -- Toronto descended on Chinatown by ...

What moments have we forgotten?

For more than 100 years, generations of photographers, photo editors and photo librarians working for The Globe and Mail have amassed and preserved an extraordinary collection of 20th-century news photography. There are many forgotten moments in this collection: original Canadian Army photos (with their censored captions), intimate portraits of the country at work and at play, and an unexpectedly large cache taken from The Globe's own airplane, “the Flying Newsroom.” Subscribers are the first to be offered access to these photos, which have been inaccessible to the public for most of this time. The News Photo Archive is a small selection of The Globe and Mail’s total archive of more than 500,000 black-and-white prints and 4 million negatives.

Many of these images have never been published. The News Photo Archive — a living archive that will grow as we process and upload photographs — offers a unique glimpse into Canada’s past.— Paula Wilson, photo researcher

Notes from the back of the photograph

Notes from the back of the photograph

What moments have we forgotten?

For more than 100 years, generations of photographers, photo editors and photo librarians working for The Globe and Mail have amassed and preserved an extraordinary collection of 20th-century news photography. There are many forgotten moments in this collection: original Canadian Army photos (with their censored captions), intimate portraits of the country at work and at play, and an unexpectedly large cache taken from The Globe's own airplane, “the Flying Newsroom.” Subscribers are the first to be offered access to these photos, which have been inaccessible to the public for most of this time. The News Photo Archive is a small selection of The Globe and Mail’s total archive of more than 500,000 black-and-white prints and 4 million negatives.

Many of these images have never been published. The News Photo Archive — a living archive that will grow as we process and upload photographs — offers a unique glimpse into Canada’s past.— Paula Wilson, photo researcher

Description

BAPTIST CHURCH OF CANADA Toronto First Baptist Church New Home for Church Founded by Slaves Minister Dedicates Toronto's New First Baptist Church "You didn't build the church. Toronto built it for you." Escaped Negro slaves who worshipped beneath Toronto trees nearly 130 years ago were remembered last night at the dedication of a new building for the First Baptist Church. This was the church they founded after traveling by secret routes from plantations in the southern states. After worshipping in three buildings, the congregation has built a $75,000 church on the corner of Huron and D'Arcy Sts. The dedication ceremony was attended by Lieutenant-Governor and Mrs. Breithaupt. It was conducted by the pastor, Rev. G. R. Williams, Rev. T. B. McDormand, general secretary of the Baptist Convention of Ontario and Quebec, and other church officials. Rev. H. E. Lewis, Bethel Baptist Church pastor and convention president, stressed in his dedication sermon that it was the faith of the congregation which build a church?not the building itself

FIRES Fireman fighting blaze ar Arnold Lumber Ltd. on Dufferin Street is silhouetted against flames.

NATIVE PEOPLE CANADA OJIBWAY MISCELLANEOUS EARL HAIG TALKING WITH OJBWAY INDIAN AT THE CHRISTIE STREET HOSPITAL, 1925. Added caption: British Commander-in-Chief during the First World War, Earl Haig visits with Ojibway First Nations war veteran at the Christie Street Veterans' Hospital in Toronto, July 25, 1925

AUGUST 14, 1945 -- VJ-DAY & END OF WORLD WAR II CELEBRATED -- Toronto descended on Chinatown by the thousands last night to celebrate the end of the 14th year of war for the Chinese and the 5 1/2 years of battle for Canadians. Within minutes of the announcement of peace Elizabeth St. was a seething mass of humanity. Reflected in the face of young and old is joyful thanksgiving as war ends. Credit: The Globe and Mail (Neg. 45226-01) Originally published August 15, 1945, page A13

Jack RUBY Dallas, Texas (DN14) DALLAS, TEX., MARCH 6---TAKEN HOSTAGE--Mrs. Thornton, with a gun at ...

What secrets are in the photos?

At a glance, images from The Globe and Mail News Photo Archive appear to be standard newspaper photos, depicting everything from political leaders to natural disasters. But a closer look uncovers a deeper story. Many photographs track their journey from camera to newspaper with notes scribbled on their backs. — Susan Allan, photo archive digitization project manager

Notes from the back of the photograph

Description

Jack RUBY Dallas, Texas (DN14) DALLAS, TEX., MARCH 6---TAKEN HOSTAGE--Mrs. Thornton, with a gun at her back, is marched down steps of Criminal Courts Building by an unidentified man in a jail break in Dallas today. The woman hostage was propelled along a corridor near the Jack Ruby murder trial courtroom. (AP Wirephoto) (cel61625stf) 1964

Jack RUBY Dallas, Texas (DN14) DALLAS, TEX., MARCH 6---TAKEN HOSTAGE--Mrs. Thornton, with a gun at ...

Cutlines

Long before digital retouching, photo editors used techniques such as white-out shading and pencil tracings to enhance images. Usually applied by airbrush, these markings would indicate the clipping path of the photo or add more definition to an image. A coloured wax pencil would be used to mark the intended crop.

Categories

On an average day, editors at The Globe and Mail might look at scores of images in order to find the 20- or 30-odd photos that were actually published. Prints were assigned category names and then filed in folders in floor-to-ceiling power files. Every effort was made to ensure fast retrieval. If an editor required a photo from the files, a photo librarian often had only minutes to find the right print. These categories are indicated, on the back of some photos, by the use of capital letters.

Photographer

Flip a picture over and, in some cases, you'll see a historical timeline for that image. Editors would add information to the backs of photos, such as the picture’s subject or location, how many times it has been used in the newspaper and where in the paper it was placed: "2nd Front, 39.9 picas, 2 ½ col," for example. Not all of the images have complete information on their backs. Some include the name of the photographer, each of whom had their own unique stamp. But others show unnamed subjects or buildings, and have no date or publishing information at all.

Property Of

In the mid-1950s, The Globe and Mail established a photo library to organize its miscellaneous collections of prints and negatives. Each day, staff of the photo library managed a deluge of photos and negatives and had the job of labelling, sorting and filing each item in its appropriate place. If available, captions, dates and photographer bylines were noted on the backs of each photo and, as a final touch, all were stamped “Property of The Globe and Mail Picture Library.”

Description

Stamps: "no cutline" "USED Jan 13 70" "USED Nov 2 472" "FiLE: AURORA automobile" "File: WORLD WAR II Canada Misc." "YPRES" "FILE: HIPPIES" "SEATON ST." "RETURN TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL PICTURE LIBRARY TORONTO CANADA." "Property of The Globe and Mail Oct 23 1961 Library" "JOHN McNEILL" "H. McLORINAN" "JOHN MAIOLA" "John Boyd" "JAMES LEWCUN" "ERIK CHRISTENSEN" "ERIK SCHACK"

Cutlines

Long before digital retouching, photo editors used techniques such as white-out shading and pencil tracings to enhance images. Usually applied by airbrush, these markings would indicate the clipping path of the photo or add more definition to an image. A coloured wax pencil would be used to mark the intended crop.

Property Of

In the mid-1950s, The Globe and Mail established a photo library to organize its miscellaneous collections of prints and negatives. Each day, staff of the photo library managed a deluge of photos and negatives and had the job of labelling, sorting and filing each item in its appropriate place. If available, captions, dates and photographer bylines were noted on the backs of each photo and, as a final touch, all were stamped “Property of The Globe and Mail Picture Library.”

Categories

On an average day, editors at The Globe and Mail might look at scores of images in order to find the 20- or 30-odd photos that were actually published. Prints were assigned category names and then filed in folders in floor-to-ceiling power files. Every effort was made to ensure fast retrieval. If an editor required a photo from the files, a photo librarian often had only minutes to find the right print. These categories are indicated, on the back of some photos, by the use of capital letters.

Photographer

Flip a picture over and, in some cases, you'll see a historical timeline for that image. Editors would add information to the backs of photos, such as the picture’s subject or location, how many times it has been used in the newspaper and where in the paper it was placed: "2nd Front, 39.9 picas, 2 ½ col," for example. Not all of the images have complete information on their backs. Some include the name of the photographer, each of whom had their own unique stamp. But others show unnamed subjects or buildings, and have no date or publishing information at all.

Description

Stamps: "no cutline" "USED Jan 13 70" "USED Nov 2 472" "FiLE: AURORA automobile" "File: WORLD WAR II Canada Misc." "YPRES" "FILE: HIPPIES" "SEATON ST." "RETURN TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL PICTURE LIBRARY TORONTO CANADA." "Property of The Globe and Mail Oct 23 1961 Library" "JOHN McNEILL" "H. McLORINAN" "JOHN MAIOLA" "John Boyd" "JAMES LEWCUN" "ERIK CHRISTENSEN" "ERIK SCHACK"

TORONTO GLOBE AND MAIL - HISTORICAL - PRODUCTION [GLOBE AND MAIL HISTORY -- WILLIAM H. WRIGHT ...
Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau walks towards the camera, cradling ... young Justin under his arm like ...

Why save the archive?

The News Photo Archive was created as a special service for subscribers to The Globe and Mail.

We are intensely proud of the fact we have helped shape Canada from the very beginning of its existence to its 150th birthday. George Brown, our publisher in 1867, was one of the fathers of Confederation. And today our award-winning journalists continue to heavily influence the country’s public policy through excellence in reporting.

This archive is the product of many months of work by a dedicated team. Please enjoy it, and thank you for your continued support of our journalistic mission. – Neil Campbell, Managing Director, Subscriptions and Licensing

Notes from the back of the photograph

Notes from the back of the photograph

Why save the archive?

The News Photo Archive was created as a special service for subscribers to The Globe and Mail.

We are intensely proud of the fact we have helped shape Canada from the very beginning of its existence to its 150th birthday. George Brown, our publisher in 1867, was one of the fathers of Confederation. And today our award-winning journalists continue to heavily influence the country’s public policy through excellence in reporting.

This archive is the product of many months of work by a dedicated team. Please enjoy it, and thank you for your continued support of our journalistic mission. – Neil Campbell, Managing Director, Subscriptions and Licensing

Description

BEATLES, The Ear-shattering screams and cries almost drowned out Beatles half-hour performance. (Maple Leaf Gardens)

SUPERSTITION Picture taken by matchlight illustrates wartime superstition. During Boer War it was found that snipers shot the third man after adjusting rifle sights on flares from first two

CENTENARIANS 102 years old and aiming to surpass her family's age record of 110, Mrs Matilda Boynton of Vancouver still smokes four cigars every day and does her own homework. Her husband, a youngster of 84, says: "She will live as long as she gets the odd tot of rum."

Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau walks towards the camera, cradling a young Justin under his arm like a football, while at left a uniformed RCMP officer performs a smart salute at Government House in Ottawa, August 10, 1973. Photo by Peter Bregg / CP

INDIANS CANADA MOHAWKS (MTL 6) OKA, QUE., Sept. 1--ITS YOUR MOVE--A Canadian soldier and a masked Mohawk Warrior come face to face in a tense standoff on the Kanesatake Reserve at Oka Saturday. The army moved onto the Reserve and began dismantling barricades. (CP Laserphoto) 1990 (str-Shaney Komulainen) bg