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Auto Shows Beyond the cars, there’s plenty to do at the AutoShow in Toronto

An operational Bugatti made of Lego bricks is displayed at the Toronto auto show.

Beyond viewing the shiny new sports cars, SUVs, pickup trucks and premium luxury cruisers in the automaker exhibit areas, there’s lots to see and do at the Canadian International AutoShow during Family Day weekend.

  • An operational, life-size Bugatti Chiron, made from more than one million Lego bricks, is a fully equipped true replica. The model includes the rear spoiler, speedometer, front and back lights, detachable steering wheel and a brake pedal. There’s also a playzone for the kids and retail space.
  • The perennially popular Auto Exotica, with 30 cars from McLaren, Lamborghini, Rolls-Royce, Aston Martin, Devel Motors and others. The Devel Sixteen generates a mind-blowing 5,000 horsepower with a quad turbo, 12.3-litre V-16 engine.
  • Mercedes-Benz entertains the kids, and likely the adults, using hydraulics to make a GLE “dance” at 2 p.m. and 6 p.m. at the automaker’s area, 800 level, South Building.
  • The yellow VW Beetle, star of the Transformers’ film Bumblebee, is staged at the Volkswagen exhibit, 300 level, North Building.
  • Be free of one another for a while. VW dealers sponsor a daycare service with arts and crafts, and interactive activities, 600 level, South Building.
  • On Family Day, comics artist Ken Lashley will teach children to draw the all-electric Mitsubishi e-Evolution concept car. Lashley, who’s created Batman, Spider-Man and X-Men covers, will conduct 45-minute sessions on Feb. 18 at 1 p.m., 2 p.m., and 3 p.m.
  • 4-D visual reality displays show Chevrolet testing, Mitsubishi’s plug-in technology and the Toyota RAV4 on the road.
  • The WorldGaming Network Pfaff Forza 7 Canadian Challenge offers $20,000 in cash and prizes.
  • The e-sports installation, part of Castrol Alley on the 700 level of the Metro Toronto Convention Centre.
  • The Alley is also home to the Art & the Automobile exhibit, presented in partnership with the Cobble Beach Concours classic car show. And the Petersen Museum is presenting six celebrity cars, lowriders, hot rods and custom jobs in the L.A. Car Culture exhibit.
  • To mark the upcoming 75th anniversary of the D-Day landing in Normandy during the Second World War, and the Road to Rome, the Ontario Regiment RCAC Museum is presenting key equipment used then and today. They include the M4 Sherman tank; the Bren Gun light armoured vehicle, the Willys MB Jeep which spawned Jeeps on the road today, and the modern Tactical Tactical Armoured Patrol Vehicle, with a V-shaped hull and blast absorbing belly designed to protect against landmines.
Electric and green or high-performance cars and the internal combustion engine, Petrina Gentile and Mark Richardson debate the future of cars at the Canadian International AutoShow in Toronto.

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