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Auto Shows The new, lavish, weird and wonderful at the Geneva auto show

A selection vehicles presented to the media at the Geneva auto show:

BMW Series 7

BMW 7 Series.

HAROLD CUNNINGHAM/AFP/Getty Images

Shown publicly for the first time, the newest iteration of the flagship model features design modifications to the front apron, hood, headlights, side panels, rear bumper trim and rear lights. It will be offered in a longer version with a 14-cm extension of the wheelbase. The standard 7-Series is also extended to offer more legroom. BMW also is displaying the world premiere for the new BMW X3 xDrive30e, the new BMW 330e, the new BMW X5 xDrive45e and plug-in hybrid members of the new BMW 7 Series range.

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VW ID. Buggy

VW I.D. Buggy.

HAROLD CUNNINGHAM/AFP/Getty Images

Inspired by Beetle-based, sand-dune conquer Beetles from Beatles years, the ID. Buggy is powered by VW’s modular electric drive matrix. It rides high, has skid plates and a body constructed from aluminum, steel, and plastic. Doors? No? Roof? No. Splendid interior? No. Roll bar? Yes. It’s meant for adventure.

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Audi Q4 e-tron

Audi Q4 e-tron concept.

PIERRE ALBOUY/Reuters

The compact SUV concept is one of four all-electric drive vehicles being displayed at the motor show. As well, there are four new plug hybrid versions of vehicles. The Audi e-tron, the larger version of the Q4, and Audi e-tron Sportback are coming to market this year. In China, the Audi Q2 L e-tron is being introduced. The Audi e-tron GT and Audi Q4 e-tron hit showrooms in 2020.

Subaru Viziv Adrenaline

Subaru Viziv Adrenaline concept.

PIERRE ALBOUY/Reuters

The crossover concept emboldens customary Subaru design to tease supercar mould. Subaru is not saying whether this car will ever be produced, nor what the engine or power may be. More likely, the company is testing appetite for redesigns of models in the current lineup, such as the Crosstrek and Legacy.

Mercedes-Benz CLA Shooting Brake

Mercedes-Benz CLA Shooting Brake.

CYRIL ZINGARO/The Associated Press

Based on the relatively new A-Class hatchback, the wagon offers drivers the dynamics of a sedan and convenience of a SUV. Reportedly, the CLA 250 will be equipped with a 2.0-litre turbocharged four-cylinder. Sportier versions will be the Mercedes-AMG CLA35 Shooting Brake and AMG CLA45.

Jeep Wrangler Rubicon 1941

Designed by Mopar and making its European debut, the street-legal Rubicon 1941 is equipped with performance parts for off-road trekking. They include a two-inch suspension lift kit, the snorkel, rock rails, black door sill, and black fuel filler door. Several design touches evoke the original Willys Jeep. The model is also being introduced to Sport and Sahara trims.

Porsche 911 Carrera 4S

Porsche 911 Carrera 4S.

Robert Hradil/Getty Images

The 3.0-litre engine generates 443 horsepower, and guns from zero to 60 mph in 3.6 seconds. Upgrade to the Sport Chrono package, you shave another 0.2 seconds. Both the hardtop and Cabriolet sit on an aluminum chassis, which is 20 mm lower than the outgoing model.

Alfa Romeo Tonale

Alfa Romeo Tonale.

DENIS BALIBOUSE/Reuters

The crossover, smaller than the Stelvio, is to be priced lower and offered as a plug-in hybrid. Displayed as a concept in Geneva, it would compete with other small SUVs including the BMW X1, Audi Q3 and Jaguar E-Pace.

Aston Martin Lagonda

Aston Martin Lagonda.

HAROLD CUNNINGHAM/AFP/Getty Images

The off-road SUV, seen as a concept in Geneva, is to be produced starting in 2022, according to the British company. Both luxurious and huge, it would feature an all-electric powertrain, huge display monitors, Swarovski crystals stitched into the seats and self-driving capability.

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