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I'm considering taking over a lease. The price and short term make sense for me right now because I don't want to buy a car. There are plenty of kilometres left on the term of the original deal, so that won't be a problem. Is there anything I should be concerned about?

Take over a lease and you could be stuck with a bill for repaired wear and tear, says an auto price-watching site.

"If it was in a minor accident and panels got painted over – at the end of the lease, the dealership is going to check the paint thickness," says unhaggle.com's Radek Garbowski. "Even if you picked it up that way, you're still responsible for that excess wear and tear."

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If the damage wasn't reported to police and was fixed at a body shop without the insurance company being involved, it won't show up on CarProof and Carfax reports, Garbowski says.

Even if it looks like you won't use up all the kilometres remaining on the lease, it's a good idea to make sure. It generally costs between 10 and 20 cents for every extra kilometre.

"The other thing is to make sure that the warranty will cover you to the end of the term," Garbowski says. "If the warranty is for 80,000 km but you're driving 100,000 km, there could be a period where you're not covered."

Could new be a better deal?

Check out manufacturer incentives on new vehicles: you might be able to get a better deal on a brand new lease, Garbowski says.

"You don't know how good a deal that customer originally got on the vehicle when they took the lease, these days," Garbowski says. "Maybe the lease rate was 3.9 per cent and now it's 0.9 per cent or 1.9 per cent."

Some car makers offer short term leases, he says.

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"That way you're getting a brand new car," he says. "It's worth seeing what's out there and what it will cost you."

Radio daze?

Are CB radios covered under distracted driving laws? Can these be used legally by drivers? What about ham radios? – John

Authorized CB users are safe from Smokey until at least 2018, says Ontario's Ministry of Transportation.

The province's October, 2009 ban on hand-held devices and display screens included a three-year exemption for hand-held two-way radios, including CH and ham radios. The ban expired in 2013 and was extended until January 1, 2018.

"By extending the exemption period an additional five years... the ministry believes this may be sufficient time for a commercially viable market to develop for hands-free alternatives to two-way radio technology while balancing the growing concerns and risks associated with distracted driving," the MTO says in an email statement.

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It doesn't mean you can pick up a CB to chat with your BFF while driving around in your BMW – the exemption is for "certain commercial, public transit and public function drivers and licensed amateur radio operators," the MTO says.

And if they're driving around in a radio daze, they can still get charged with careless driving.

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