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New and redesigned cars push auto sales higher

The Honda Civic, Canada's best-selling passenger car for 15 consecutive years, extends its competitive lead and value for customers with a long list of enhancements for the 2014 model year.

CNW Group/HONDA CANADA INC.

The Honda Civic has maintained its lead as the best-selling passenger car in Canada, ahead of the Hyundai Elantra.

On the truck side of the ledger, the F-Series pickup is well ahead of its closest competitors, and it's poised to remain the best-selling truck and best-selling vehicle overall in Canada.

Data compiled by DesRosiers Automotive Consultants Inc. (click here to see the full list) show the status quo among the best-selling vehicles has held through the first 10 months of the year.

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Honda Canada Inc. sold 6,852 Civics in October, up 36 per cent from a year earlier and a much better performance than Hyundai Auto Canada Corp., which saw its Elantra sales fall 6 per cent to 4,021.

But the numbers represent the impact of new or redesigned vehicles in moving the sales needle for all auto makers, DesRosiers pointed out.

On the car side, new versions of the Toyota Corolla and Mazda3 compacts led to increases in October of 23 per cent and 52 per cent respectively. A redesign of the GMC Sierra and Chevrolet Silverado led to double-digit increases in both of those full-sized pickups for General Motors of Canada Ltd.

Those gains are part of the robust performance by pickup trucks across the industry so far this year.

Sales of all large pickups rose 12 per cent in the first 10 months from the year-earlier period amid the strong economy in Western Canada – a market where pickups fare best – and the recovery of the housing and construction industries throughout much of the rest of the country.

"We believe consumers buying these vehicles for personal use is [also] an important part of their higher sales this year; read that as oil money flowing into the pockets of consumers in the West," DesRosiers said.

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About the Author
Auto and Steel Industry Reporter

Greg Keenan has covered the automotive and steel industries for The Globe and Mail since 1995. He also writes about broader manufacturing trends. He is a graduate of the University of Toronto and of the University of Western Ontario School of Journalism. More

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