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Life at the cottage – or cabin as it’s known in some parts of Canada – is about unwinding and spending quality time with friends and family in the great outdoors.

For the wealthy, it’s also a chance to play and entertain on luxury toys like spacious boats, high-end grills or maybe even a private island.

Here are some must-have amenities for the ultra-high-net-worth heading to cottage country this summer:

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A more serene floating boathouse

NyDock floating docks can be disconnected from their ramps in winter to minimize damage.

NyDock/Handout

Designed for inland lakes, NyDock floating boathouses are perfect for cottage owners who are “frustrated with constant fluctuating water levels,” says Chris Ivanov, sales and marketing manager at Huntsville, Ont.-based Pipefusion Services Inc., which manufactures NyDock. “The customers that have purchased our boathouses have been cottage owners and other Muskoka residents that live on the water.”

NyDock floating docks are installed on rust- and rot-proof flotation systems. To minimize damage in the winter, the boathouse can be disconnected from its ramp and allowed to freeze in the ice; the anchor system holds it in place while allowing for movement. The cost ranges between about $120,000 to $150,000 for the standard boathouse model, finished and installed.

Low-maintenance, fume-free motor boat

The Rand leisure boat is powered by a fume-free electric motor.

Rand Boats/Handout

A Scandinavian boat manufacturer proves that good Danish design isn’t just for the land.

The Rand leisure boat, which starts at approximately $164,000, is aesthetically pleasing with a teak upper deck, sleek kitchen and an infotainment system. However, it’s the fume-free electric motors that make the boat perfect for areas where loud power boats are discouraged.

“Maintenance on the motor is almost non-existent, so you never have to change filters, fluids, seals or renovate parts,” says Oscar Kai Rand, head of sales and marketing at Rand Boats. Simply push a button and you are on the way, with very little down time for repairs, he says.

Rand offers four electric-powered boats ranging from 18 to 28 feet, with space for up to 12 people. Gasoline and diesel engines are also available.

A pontoon boat and personal waterpark

The Avalon Excalibur is a party on the lake.

Avalon/Handout

Designed for leisure boating and fishing, pontoon boats are a simple way to get out on the lake at the cottage.

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Avalon’s top model, the 27-foot Excalibur, seats up to 16 people and costs roughly $153,000. With custom furniture, touchscreen dash, mood lighting, premium speakers, hydraulic tilt steering and a fridge and sink, this boat is a party on the lake. A tow bar allows for tubing, cruising and water-skiing, and a Garmin Fishfinder and water-depth GPS system helps with the daily catch.

A fully customized Excalibur Elite Windshield model with a 400-horsepower engine, detailing options, in-floor storage and an integrated GX Sport Tower costs around $196,000. The company’s Funship – described as “your own private waterpark” with double-decker sundeck and waterslide – ranges from about $70,000 to $90,000, depending on engine configurations.

A grill master’s dream barbecue

The Hybrid Fire Grill allows you to cook with gas, charcoal or wood.

Kalamazoo Outdoor Gourmet/Handout

Who wants to be stuck in the kitchen at the cottage? Moving the food preparation outside is ideal at a summer home.

If you want the option to cook with gas, wood or charcoal, there’s a grill that incorporates all three. The Hybrid Fire Grill’s temperatures range from 250 to 1,000 degrees, allowing you to sear, roast and smoke all on one appliance. Add charcoal or wood to the grill drawer or leave it empty to cook with gas. Foil packets of wet wood chips, which can be added without opening the hood, allow for smoking.

The company claims that the size and distance between grill grates and burners in their barbecues create more effective cooking and minimize flare-ups. The one-quarter inch stainless steel grates come in three patterns for different types of cooking and can be customized with logos, initials or artwork. The price ranges from about $19,600 to $41,200.

Fishing has never been so comfortable

The Sea-Doo Fish Pro 155 is a personal watercraft designed for sport fishing.

Bombardier/Handout

Bombardier’s Sea-Doo, a brand that’s synonymous with personal watercraft, has been making the lake cruisers for more than 50 years.

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The Canadian brand has a new model for 2019, The Fish Pro 155, designed specifically for sport fishing. The watercraft, which costs just over $18,000, seats three people and has a sideways-facing fishing seat with angled gunwale footrests, Garmin Fishfinder navigation and a boarding ladder. The removable 51-litre storage bin is designed for fishing with rod holders, tackle and bait storage, and a quick-latch system.

The Rotax engine will run in trolling mode, which allows the rider to cruise at low speeds without using the throttle and the ST3 hull and extended rear platform increases stability.

A luxury take on the classic canoe

A red cedar Langford Canoe takes between five and seven weeks to build by hand.

Langford Canoe/Handout

A lakefront cottage in Canada seems bare without a canoe.

Langford Canoe, the oldest canoe company in Canada, makes canoes with Kevlar and carbon fibre, but the company’s most popular model is a classic wood canoe. Built with B.C. red cedar, each contains 2,000 brass tacks and takes between five and seven weeks to build by hand at the company’s factory in Shawinigan, Que.

When transporting the iconic canoes by truck, “people point and take photos,” says Langford owner Andrew Salamon. “These are the canoes traders and explorers would have used.”

The Huron’s wide beam makes it stable for family paddling, hunting or fishing; it weighs 59 pounds and has a capacity of 690 pounds. The cost is about $5,895. Langford also makes a decorative five-foot canoe designed to hang indoors as art for around $1,195.

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Your own floating island

An Orsos Island floating island costs $13.4-million, depending on customization.

Orsos Islands/Handout

To really get away from it all – including the neighbours – nothing beats living on your own island. The Orsos Islands floating island – for a cool $13.4-million, depending on customization – measures approximately 20-by-37 metres, with room for 12 residents on three floors. It can also accommodate up to four staff members, if needed, and can be used as a boutique hotel or restaurant.

Multiple outdoor decks allow for barbecue space, a Jacuzzi, lounging space, a fitness platform and ladders for water access. An outdoor storage facility is perfect for sport and diving equipment and mooring motor boats; the interior space has skylights, an aquarium and fully equipped staterooms. The lowest level is a large entertainment space with a kitchen.

“The island can be used on lakes or ocean, can be relocated using a tug boat or transport ship,” says Orsos manager Akos Dominek. The island is powered by a wind energy system and solar panels, while its seawater heat-recovery enables environmentally friendly heating and air conditioning.

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