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The Canadian dollar edged lower against its U.S. counterpart on Tuesday, pulling back from an earlier 11-day high as NAFTA trade pact uncertainty offset higher oil prices and stronger-than-expected domestic wholesale trade data.

At 3:38 p.m. EDT, the Canadian dollar was trading 0.2 per cent lower at $1.2816 to the greenback, or 78.03 U.S. cents.

The loonie touched its strongest since May 11 at $1.2742. But without clarity on prospects for the North American Free Trade Agreement, which is being renegotiated by Canada, the United States and Mexico, it may be difficult for the currency to exit its recent range of $1.2730 to $1.2998.

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“Oil and other commodities suggest the Canadian dollar is undervalued … whereas interest rate spreads and continuing NAFTA uncertainty are pushing things in the opposite direction,” said Michael Goshko, corporate risk manager at Western Union Business Solutions.

U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin on Monday said major issues remained in talks.

Canada sends about 75 per cent of its exports to the United States, so its economy could be hurt if a deal on NAFTA is not reached.

Canadian wholesale trade jumped by 1.1 per cent in March, greater than the 0.6 per cent gain forecast by analysts, thanks largely to strength in the motor vehicle and parts subsector, Statistics Canada said.

The price of oil, one of Canada’s major exports, notched a 3-1/2-year high, supported by concern that falling Venezuelan crude output and a potential drop in Iranian exports could further tighten global supply.

U.S. crude oil futures settled 0.2 per cent higher at $72.13 a barrel.

Canadian government bond prices were lower across a flatter yield curve as trading resumed following Monday’s Victoria Day holiday. The two-year fell 2 cents to yield 2.043 per cent and the 10-year declined 3.5 cents to yield 2.490 per cent.

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On Thursday, the 10-year yield touched its highest in more than four years at 2.537 per cent.

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