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Students at Pimbiniet Primary School in Kenya’s Narok South district learn about agriculture from teacher Thomas Maritim.

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Students at Pimbiniet Primary School in Kenya’s Narok South district.

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Grade 8 student Miriam Chebet, who studies at Pimbiniet Primary School in Narok South, wants to go to the nearby all-girls Kisaruni Secondary School when she finishes here, and eventually become a doctor to support her community.

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Paul Mutai, who’s in Grade 8 at Pimbiniet Primary School, has sometimes had to stay home from school while his parents went out to find food.

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Thomas Maritim, head teacher at Pimbiniet Primary School in Kenya’s Narok South District.

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An old classroom at Enelerai Primary School, which was prone to flooding and barely capable of sheltering students from the elements. The old mud-and-dung walls have decayed over time; students now learn in new classrooms built by Free the Children.

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A new classroom built by Free the Children at Enelerai Primary School in Narok South district, Kenya.

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Handprints line the wall of the new library at Enelerai Primary School in Narok South district, Kenya.

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When Violet Akinyi‘s mother died, her new stepmother made her stay home to do chores instead of going to school. Her aunt took her to Nairobi, where she’s now in Grade 8 at Ngunyumu Primary School. She wants to be a journalist when she grows up, to tell the stories of people who have been denied their rights.

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Students in class at Ngunyumu Primary School in Nairobi’s Korogocho slum. Many students drop out from this school to pick through the city’s biggest dump, a stone’s throw away, to sell on the roadside for money for their families.

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Students from Ngunyumu Primary School in Nairobi’s Korogocho slum surround gym teacher Gilbert Moywaywa. The school has a robust after-school program that lets students and neighbourhood children take part in activities from karate to choir.

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Food is cooked in three vats at Ngunyumu Primary School in Korogocho. The maize inside is often the only meal some students will eat on a given day. “When children see smoke coming from the kitchen, they know they are OK,” teacher Gilbert Moywaywa says.

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Students at Ngunyumu Primary School in Korogocho are served what might be their only meal for the day. Some take extra food home to their hungry families.

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Broken windows dot the classrooms at Kibera’s Raila Educational Centre.

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An empty classroom at Raila Educational Centre in Kibera, Nairobo – the largest slum in Africa.

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