Skip to main content

The Globe and Mail

Alcohol advertising influencing teen girls; should contain health warnings

A beer store in Oakville, Ont. that shows new branding and updated style on May 14, 2013.

Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

A medical journal is raising concerns about alcohol advertising, saying young girls are being influenced by the ads.

The editorial in this week's issue of the Canadian Medical Association Journal says health warnings should be embedded in alcohol ads, so that young girls understand the risks of drinking.

The author, Dr. Ken Flegel, says parents should also model responsible alcohol consumption for their children.

Story continues below advertisement

The editorial says studies from the United States show that alcohol advertising aimed at young women is being viewed more commonly by young girls.

The studies also show that increased exposure to alcohol advertising is linked to an increase in drinking in adolescents.

Flegel says that's probably because adolescent girls spend more time reading fashion magazines or watching TV, places where the ads are published or aired.

He says girls need to understand that drinking increases their risk of a number of health conditions, including breast cancer.

Other female-specific risks of drinking include unwanted sex and pregnancy as well as being subjected to violence, the editorial says.

Report an error
Comments

The Globe invites you to share your views. Please stay on topic and be respectful to everyone. For more information on our commenting policies and how our community-based moderation works, please read our Community Guidelines and our Terms and Conditions.

We’ve made some technical updates to our commenting software. If you are experiencing any issues posting comments, simply log out and log back in.

Discussion loading… ✨