Skip to main content

The Globe and Mail

A modern home that's a litle bit prefab, a little bit not

1 of 9

At the top of the stairs, a cupola washes a wall in diffused sunlight, which makes it the perfect spot for hanging a large piece of artwork.

George Opreff/George Opreff Photography

2 of 9

George Opreff/George Opreff Photography

3 of 9

‘Because the house is so precisely built,’says Mr. Yen, ‘I could pre-order the kitchen ahead of time and know that it will fit.’

George Opreff/George Opreff Photography

4 of 9

George Opreff/George Opreff Photography

Story continues below advertisement

5 of 9

George Opreff/George Opreff Photography

6 of 9

George Opreff/George Opreff Photography

7 of 9

A crane places a prefab module during construction of 219 Roe Ave. The couple’s neighbours were ‘very supportive,’ says Mr. Yen, partly because he was very open about what he planned to do, but also because ‘the time-efficiency also gains their support, because I can tell them that we’ll have one day of cranes instead of a year of messiness.’ The tractor-trailer can transport a module 16 feet wide, 56 feet long and with an 11-foot ceiling. Mr. Yen and Ms. Ma were able to achieve 13-foot ceilings by cutting the floor and dropping it down into the foundation.

Gary Yen

8 of 9

219 Roe Ave.’s modules under construction in the Quebec factory. While the factory could probably crank out 500 homes a year, Studio Architectonic is aiming to work on about five: ‘We like to provide a turnkey solution instead of the usual exterior envelope that architects do.’ The brick and zinc cladding of their home cost about $30,000, but Mr. Yen says if he had chosen to have siding done at the factory, he would have spent far, far less.

Gary Yen

9 of 9

George Opreff/George Opreff Photography

Report an error