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Kelly Deck Design; kitchen in Vancouver's Dunbar neighbourhood. In life, elegance in everyday items is more important than elegance in occasional ones. The centrepiece of this home of six people, the kitchen had to be as durable as it was stylish.

Barry Calhoun Photography/Barry Calhoun Photography

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The designer created a perimeter whose layered ivory felt light and open. It started with luxurious backsplash tile, a diamond pattern of handmade ceramic by Anne Saks. Then, a matching quartz countertop and a warm white on the cabinet doors was layered on.

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Quartz countertop.

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An industrial-looking hood fan was selected, giving the room a masculine element to balance it's prettiness with utilitarian rigour.

Barry Calhoun Photography/Barry Calhoun Photography

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Kelly Deck says: 'Unless a kitchen is aesthetically modern and the design has more horizontal elements than vertical ones, I always insist on taking kitchen cabinetry to the ceiling. The reason is simple: if the cabinets stop short of the ceiling, the 12- to 16-inch gap becomes a home suitable only to tacky serving ware, fake ferns, and antique milk jugs.'

Barry Calhoun Photography/Barry Calhoun Photography

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Nothing shows fingerprints better than polished finishes, it's true. But the Kelly Deck design team, headed by Carly Liang, RID, decided to take the risk of trading a measure of function for form. A brushed finish would look lifeless against this kitchen's finishes.

Barry Calhoun Photography/Barry Calhoun Photography

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