Skip to main content

Between breakfast, lunch and dinner, kitchens can be chaos. But, as the owners of these Canadian kitchens reveal, clever design (and loads of hidden storage) can turn the hardest-working room in the house into a tranquil modern retreat

1 of 15

Matthew Carmichael’s 11-by-17-foot kitchen was designed with two principal goals in mind: maximum functionality and tranquillity.

Blair Gable for The Globe and Mail/blair gable The Globe and Mail

2 of 15

The stainless-steel portion of the island makes a perfect prep station, out fitted with sink, dishwasher and plenty of drawers to hide tea towels, kitchen tools and cutlery.

Blair Gable for The Globe and Mail/blair gable The Globe and Mail

3 of 15

Carmichael replaced a bay window with a large single pane and a glass- panelled door to create the illusion of more space.

Blair Gable for The Globe and Mail/blair gable The Globe and Mail

4 of 15

The refrigerator is hidden behind high-gloss IKEA cabinetry to keep visual clutter to a minimum.

Blair Gable for The Globe and Mail/blair gable The Globe and Mail

Story continues below advertisement

5 of 15

The artwork, a memento from a trip to Australia, provides a jolt of personality.

Blair Gable for The Globe and Mail/blair gable The Globe and Mail

6 of 15

The island’s walnut surround is raised to create a cleverly concealed storage spot for bowls and plates.

Blair Gable for The Globe and Mail/blair gable The Globe and Mail

7 of 15

The kitchen belonging to Hélène Deneault and Jacques Boily features a garage door that creates a strong link between their indoor and outdoor spaces. A series of large windows make the narrow galley feel light and airy, and put a windowbox of herbs within reach.

Handout | Angus McRitchie/Handout | Angus McRitchie

8 of 15

A walk-in pantry is tucked behind floor-to-ceiling sliding doors. They left room under the stairs for an off-the-kitchen bathroom.

Will Lew for The Globe and Mail/will lew The Globe and Mail

9 of 15

The fridge is also hidden behind the wood wall.

Handout | Angus McRitchie/Handout | Angus McRitchie

10 of 15

An alcove under the stairs contains the oven and cooktop, a hidden hood and a granite prep station.

Handout | Angus McRitchie/Handout | Angus McRitchie

11 of 15

When John and Patsy Bell designed their kitchen, environmental sensitivity and their young family were top of mind.

Kristin Sjaarda for The Globe and Mail/kristin sjaarda The Globe and Mail

12 of 15

The Nguni chairs, handcrafted in Africa from Kiaat wood and woven cord seats and purchased at Snob in Toronto, add depth and visual drama to the monochromatic room.

Kristin Sjaarda for The Globe and Mail/kristin sjaarda The Globe and Mail

13 of 15

Custom whiteash cabinet doors conceal a stainlesssteel Energy Star refrigerator from view to bolster the kitchen’s predominantly white palette.

Kristin Sjaarda for The Globe and Mail/kristin sjaarda The Globe and Mail

14 of 15

The microwave is stowed in a niche built into the island, keeping it within close range of the fridge.

Kristin Sjaarda for The Globe and Mail/kristin sjaarda The Globe and Mail

15 of 15

The custom dining table is made from the same untreated white oak as the floors: “The idea was to make it seem like it was melting into the floor,” Patsy Bell says.

Kristin Sjaarda for The Globe and Mail/kristin sjaarda The Globe and Mail

Report an error