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Style Blooms by the glass at Toronto’s Miss Pippa’s

Miss Pippa's is a a hybrid flower shop and wine bar in Toronto.

Adam Moco/Handout

Visiting Miss Pippa’s in Toronto is like being welcomed into the home of owners and partners Anton Levin and Adam Moco. The floral-shop-meets-wine-bar is filled with personal touches, from Moco’s photography hanging on the walls to furniture inherited from friends and family. “The decor is just basically things that I love and put together,” Levin says of the cozy atmosphere on College Street just west of Dufferin.

Moco and Levin met in 2017 while living in Lisbon, returning to Moco’s hometown of Toronto the following year (Levin grew up in Stockholm). Levin wanted to transform his expertise as a professional florist into a shareable experience. “Drinking wine with a lot of flowers around you is quite nice,” he points out. While walking to their favourite local coffee shop in January, they noticed a for lease sign on a neighbouring storefront. Less than two weeks later, the space was theirs.

The selection at Miss Pippa’s reads like a page from Moco and Levin’s travel diaries. Alongside seasonal blooms, find Swedish candies and Portuguese wines to order by the glass as well as sandwiches, salads and a selection of cheese to nibble in the evening. The gift shop is stocked with locally made products from brands and friends of the couple, such Andrew Coimbra Jewellery and Gold Apothecary skin care. “Even though we’re calling ourselves a wine and cheese bar, we don’t want it to come off like we’re wine and cheese snobs,” Moco points out. There’s certainly nothing snobby about Miss Pippa’s, which prides itself on being a queer-owned business where everyone is welcome.

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Miss Pippa’s, 1158 College St., Toronto, 647-479-6913, misspippas.com.

Style news

Two Canadian leather goods brands are introducing new styles this summer. Toronto-based Namesake has recently launched small leather goods, a collection that includes three leather pouches in various sizes, as well as a passport holder. Available in croc embossed leather with the passport holder also available in classic black leather, all styles can be stamped with a personal monogram. And launching Aug. 1 is Voylan, a new designed-in-Canada, made-in-Italy handbag brand. Its bags are designed to be used on the go and include dedicated spaces for phones, computers, water bottles and keys.

Following a visit to Vietnam where they witnessed the impact of textile waste firsthand, three teens are doing their part to reduce its impact. Until Aug. 10, visit Project Thrift, a charitable pop-up thrift shop taking place at Stackt Market (28 Bathurst St., Toronto). The thrift shop will sell used clothing in excellent condition, from everyday casual wear to designer finds. All proceeds from Project Thrift will be donated to Greenpeace Canada, a non-profit organization that helps to reduce the impacts of climate change. For more information, visit projectthrift.org.

A new YouTube feature is ushering beauty vlogging into a new era. The Google-owned company has announced that it will be adding augmented reality to the platform, allowing viewers to try on makeup virtually while they watch videos. AR Beauty Try-On operates as a split-screen experience, where the makeup tutorial plays at the top of the screen while the bottom streams from the viewer’s own camera. Users will be able to tap from a palette of makeup shades to see them on their own faces while watching the video. M.A.C is the first brand that will be launching an AR Beauty Try-On campaign.

Eyewear brand Warby Parker has introduced a new collaboration with Canadian artist Geoff McFetridge. Although he’s the artist behind much of the unique artwork decorating Warby Parker’s stores and has been working with the brand since 2013, this is McFetridge’s first product design collaboration with WP. This collection of sunglasses reflects his classic, minimal style and each pair comes with a limited-edition frame case and lens cloth featuring McFetridge’s artwork. Warby Parker will be making a donation to LA-Mas, an urban design non-profit in Los Angeles, where McFetridge now lives. For more information, visit warbyparker.com.

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