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Speaker brand Sonos has a retail location at Toronto's Stackt Market.

ARASH MOALLEMI/Handout

There was a time when having a great home stereo system required bulky speakers, yards of cables and wires and a complicated amp set up. Not anymore. American speaker brand Sonos has made the listening experience both simple and aesthetically pleasing without compromising on sound. Their delightfully petite speakers are customizable to the home, connect over WiFi and can be controlled by your smartphone, either through the Sonos app, through a partner app or with your voice using Amazon Alexa or Google Assistant. Sonos is designed to play any kind of digital audio, connecting to more than 100 different types of streaming services that offer music, podcasts, audiobooks and even good old fashion radio.

For its Canadian retail debut, Sonos has popped up at Stackt Market in Toronto until the end of September. Here, audiophiles can experiment with the brand’s technology firsthand. “We know from our customers that listening is believing,” says Nicole Gullaci, senior marketing manager for Sonos Canada. “We’re focused on delivering an amazing sound experience, a design that blends into the background of the home and an open platform to give people the freedom to choose however they want to listen,” she says.

Through the end of September, audiophiles can experiment with Sonos's products at its retail space.

arash moallemi/Handout

Earlier this month, the brand revealed Symfonisk, its new partnership with Ikea, which makes the Sonos experience more easily available. “It’s the start of a long-term ambition to explore new ways to improve sound within the home,” Gullaci says. “Sound is an important consideration when it comes to the design of your home, just like choosing the perfect lighting or candle to suit your mood.”

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Sonos, 28 Bathurst St., Toronto, sonos.com.

Style news

For spring 2020, Canadian designer Hilary MacMillan has announced that she’s extending her range of sizing. For this collection, she’s introducing extended sizing for select pieces up to 4X and dress size 22. Before presenting her collection at Toronto Fashion Week in September, it is available to preorder online at hilarymacmillan.com until Sept. 18. The collection will then be available for sale in March. Based in Toronto, MacMillan’s label is cruelty-free and known for its Feminist Capsule collection. It is available online, in boutiques and at select Hudson’s Bay locations.

Montreal’s annual Festival Mode & Design is back for its 19th year. The unique outdoor event takes place in downtown Montreal’s Quartiers des spectacles from Aug. 19 to 24, presenting 50 shows and 300 participants in the fields of fashion, design, music and beauty for an expected 550,000 visitors. This year’s programming includes a series of talks given by Denis Gagnon, Jerome C. Rousseau and Marie Wilkinson, runway presentations from emerging and established brands and a performance by Les Ballets Jazz de Montréal dance company. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit festivalmodedesign.com/en/.

In Victoria, a unique temporary pop-up is coming to the city’s famously narrow Fan Tan Alley. From Aug. 16 to 18, Upside Studios (18½ Fan Tan Alley) will be hosting Harvest Moon, a pop-up concept store featuring goods from wellness, home, beauty, children’s and accessories designers. In addition to shopping, it’s offering different installations throughout the weekend, including a wine tasting by A Sunday in August, canapés and karaoke by Very Chill Weekend and eats by Dumpling Drop. Brands involved include Foe & Dear, Bronze Age, Rachel Saunders Ceramics and Your Bag of Holding.

American fashion house Coach has teamed up with British shoe designer Tabitha Simmons on a new collaborative capsule collection. It features Simmons’s debut in the handbag space, the Coach x Tabitha Simmons Crossbody, which is a reimagining of Coach’s 1973 Suspender Pouch, handpicked by Simmons from the Coach archives and reintroduced with florals, rivets and colour-blocking. The footwear in the collection combines Simmons’s signature eccentric femininity with Coach’s New York spirit, and conveys the brands’ shared love of colour and print via styles such as hiker boots in floral-printed velvet. For more information, visit coach.com.

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