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Style Toronto the Goop: Gwyneth Paltrow’s brand spends the summer in Yorkville

The Goop Mrkt Toronto pop-up is at the Hazleton Hotel until September 22.

Adrian Gaut/Handout

A pioneer in the booming modern wellness movement, Gwyneth Paltrow’s Goop is spending the summer in Toronto. From now until Sept. 22, the Goop Mrkt retail concept will be located in Yorkville’s Hazelton Hotel. Designed by Yabu Pushelberg to evoke the area’s history as the birthplace of the Toronto International Film Festival, the 1,300-square-foot space is the first Goop Mrkt pop-up in Canada.

What started out as a newsletter in 2008 has quickly grown into a 360-degree media brand, a platform that includes the recently launched Goopfellas podcast focused on men. Goop’s endeavours now go beyond the digital into real-world experiences such as the In Goop Health wellness summit, which had a stop in Vancouver last year. “For Toronto, we wanted to do something bigger, a little flashier,” Elise Loehnen, Goop’s chief content officer, says. “The context and the setting – it’s all important. We spend a lot of energy thinking about every single detail.”

At the Goop Mrkt, find goods curated specifically for Goop’s Toronto audience. “Canadians tend to be a little ahead in terms of wellness, you sometimes set the pace for us as a brand,” Loehnen says. There’s clean beauty from Tata Harper, Vintner’s Daughter and Goop’s in-house line, fashion by Bassike, Rhode and Natalie Martin and home and wellness items. To further bring the space to life, there will be in-store events such as tarot-card readings, trunk shows and piercing parties. “Story is part of the entire experience, whether it’s retail or actual content on the site,” Loehnen says. “We pick brands and the lines that we sell really carefully.”

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Goop Mrkt Toronto, 118 Yorkville Ave., Toronto, 416-968-6144, goop.com.

Style news

Toronto’s Gee Beauty is bringing its city favourites to cottage-goers until July 15, as the boutique beauty destination will be popping-up in Muskoka. Held in the Dukes Building in Port Carling, Ont., the pop-up will include summer-inspired treatments such as brow and lash enhancements, makeup applications and express facials. It will also stock products from skin-care brands such as Dr. Barbara Sturm, Dr. Sebagh and Le Labo, as well as 6 by Gee Beauty home essentials. The pop-up coincides with a closure of the Toronto location, which will be undergoing renovations. For more information, visit geebeauty.com.

The Toronto Fringe Festival has put issues of sustainability in fashion on the marquee. For the world premiere of Clotheswap, members of the audience are invited to bring bags of used clothing to the theatre. It will then be used to stimulate improvisation within the performance and will be donated to charities Sistering and Dress for Success following the performance. Featuring an all-female cast and crew, Clotheswap takes place at the Textile Museum of Canada July 3 to 14, and guests will be granted free admission to the museum. For more information, visit clotheswapshow.ca.

Just a few short weeks after its sixth annual gala at the Fairmont Royal York hotel, the Canadian Arts & Fashion Awards (CAFA) is back promoting our national fashion industry with the Wear Canada Proud Pop-Up. Located in Albert’s Way at the CF Toronto Eaton Centre, the pop-up shop highlights some of Canada’s top fashion design talent, including Biko, Dean Davidson, Leah Alexandra, Matt & Nat, Moose Knuckles, Hilary MacMillan, NOGU and Roots. Toronto-based jewellery designer Jenny Bird has made exclusive pieces for the pop-up, which is open until July 12.

Vancouver athletic apparel company Lululemon is expanding into the beauty world. The Selfcare Formula is its new line of beauty products designed with active lifestyles in mind as offering solutions to sweaty problems. Tested on more than 100 Lululemon ambassadors from across North America who practice yoga, spin, run and train, the range is Leaping Bunny certified. The items in the collection include a dry shampoo, facial moisturizer, deodorants and a balm, each of which is approved for carry-on travel and comes in a leak-proof container.

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