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School board says father-daughter dances violate state law

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Talk about political correctness run amok.

A Rhode Island school department has announced it is banning father-daughter dances because they violate state law, the Providence Journal reports. The traditional dances are a form of gender discrimination, don't you know.

Mother-son activities are being axed too (because it's only fair).

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School superintendent Judith Lundsten said the ban came after a letter from the American Civil Liberties Union. A single mom had complained that her daughter wasn't able attend the father-daughter dance at school.

While federal legislation against gender discrimination allows for "father-daughter" and "mother-son" activities, noted Lundsten, Rhode Island law is more stringent.

In a letter explaining the ban, Lundsten said, "I acknowledge that many of these events have long traditions and for many parents, these types of gender-based events are not an issue, however, this is a public school system and under no circumstances should we be isolating any student from full participation in school activities and events based on gender," reports the radio station WPRO.

School committee member Janice Ruggieri reportedly said that schools can begin hosting "family dances" instead. Father-daughter dances, R.I.P.? They are "kinda creepy," writes Bob-342114 , commenting at NBCNews.com. But in a NBC poll on whether father-daughter dances are discriminatory, 88 per cent of 24,100 readers voted a resounding "no."

Margaret-497103 described her father-daughter dance 50 years ago as "one of my fondest memories." Her advice to fatherless daughters: "Find a male relative and deal w/it!"

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About the Author

Adriana Barton is based in The Globe and Mail’s Vancouver bureau. Her article on growing up with counterculture parents is published in a McGraw-Hill anthology, right after an essay by Margaret Atwood. She wishes her last name didn’t start with B. More

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