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The Globe and Mail

A closer look at an Indian safari

Join acclaimed Canadian photographer Patrice Halley in remote national parks that are home to Royal Bengal tigers

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The density of tigers in Bandhavgarh is one of the highest in India. The park also has a large population of leopards and various species of deer.

Patrice Halley/Patrice Halley

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The Mahua Khoti Lodge sprawls over 16 hectares and located 20 minutes from the Bandhavgarh National Park entrance. The original homestead has been beautifully renovated.

Patrice Halley/Patrice Halley

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Banjaar Tola, Taj Safari's tented camp is found along the banks of the Banjaar River, directly overlooking the heart of Kanha National Park. Kanha is the inspiration for Rudyar Kipling's Jungle Book.

Patrice Halley/Patrice Halley

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The luxurious tents designed in a contemporary style, with pressed bamboo wall panels, bamboo floors and locally crafted furniture hewn from the timber of exotic Indian trees.

Patrice Halley/Patrice Halley

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Enjoy traditional Indian fare at the luxury tented camp Banjaar Tola, then watch jungle life pass by on the Banjaar River.

Patrice Halley/Patrice Halley

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When a leopard or tiger is spotted in Bandhavgarh, all the tours stop to take a look.

Patrice Halley/Patrice Halley

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A large number of deer in Bandhavgarh National Park means there is also a healthy population of tigers.

Patrice Halley/Patrice Halley

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Over 300 species of birds live Kahna National Park, including the Lesser Adjutant stork. The park is a birdwatcher's paradise.

Patrice Halley/Patrice Halley

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Nonchalantly staring at the unwanted crowd of tourists, a bored tiger waits for an opening in the traffic jam. Eyeing its escape route, the cat heads to the depths of the forest in an impeccable feline move.

Patrice Halley/Patrice Halley

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