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A closer look at the waters off Igloolik

Once a year it becomes a busy place as whales, walruses and other creatures wait for icy straights to melt

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Margo Pfeiff and fellow travellers smell the walruses before they see them. On a pancake of ice, they are massive blobs of brown and pink blubber adorned with mustaches and tusks, grunting, snorting and, yes, farting.

Margo Pfeiff/Margo Pfeiff

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The polar bear we were following swims into a fog bank that blocks our route to walrus waters, she writes.

Margo Pfeiff

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Visitors to Igloolik stray far onto the ice to see migrating bowhead whales gather by the thousands for two weeks in July.

Margo Pfeiff/Margo Pfeiff

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A bowhead whale smashes through 60 centimetres of ice with the distinctive bump on the top of its skull.

Margo Pfeiff/Margo Pfeiff

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Lunch tastes so much better when you're eating on an ice floe overlooking the Foxe Basin.

Margo Pfeiff/Margo Pfeiff

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Igloolik, home to artists, an Inuit circus troupe and the Rockin’ Walrus Festival, is Nunavut’s arts capital.

Margo Pfeiff/Margo Pfeiff

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