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Explore Recoleta, a Buenos Aires neighbourhood

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Dog walkers are a common sight on Recoleta’s streets.

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A gracious building on Avenue Callau in Recoleta, Buenos Aires.

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Window shoppers check out the wares at a one of Recoleta’s high-end antique stores.

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Handmade silk scarves tempt visitors.

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El Ateneo Bookstore inhabits a famous former theatre.

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El Anjanino is a wildly popular restaurant, specializing in empanadas, that offers homemade, affordable eating in tony Recoleta.

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You can rent bikes at the Plaza Vicente Lopez, just a block from the Buenos Aires Grand Hotel.

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Generous portions define the traditional Argentine breakfast meal, “revuelto de gramajo“ (potatoes, ham and egg) at the Restaurant Covadonga at the corner of Arenales and Riobamba streets.

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Florentines at the venerable bakery, La Exposicion, next to the Buenos Aires Grand Hotel.

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The entrance to Recoleta Cemetery.

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A tomb in Recoleta Cemetery.

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An elaborate crypt fronts an avenue of similar tombs in Recoleta Cemetery.

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A detail from the crypt of Eve Peron in Recoleta Cemetery.

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