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A drive through the park takes you past oceans of iridescent black rock. It's a little eerie but the sci-fi landscape will take your breath away

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Clambering over the sheet (or pahoehoe) lava is half the fun of exploring the dark landscape.

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Inside the Jaggar Museum at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Warren Costa of Native Hawaii Guide explains the creation myth of the islands.

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Continual eruptions in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park can make roads impassable.

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The Ohia tree is the first plant to grow in the cracks of hardened lava.

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The Ohelo berry bush, a plant sacred to Pele the volcano goddess, grows amid the cinder and dead wood of an old eruption.

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The swirls and puddles of hardend lava create a bleak landscape but, hundreds of years later, it will be covered by lush tropical growth.

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Lava from Kilauea Volcano meets the sea on Hawaii Island.

Hawaii Tourism

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