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In Mount Edziza Provincial Park, caribou and bears are lonely travellers on trails carved thousands of years ago

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Here the brush is thriving, but many of the cinder cones at Mount Edziza are devoid of vegetation.

Matt J. Simmons

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Rugged vegetation survives in the volcanic landscape.

Matt J. Simmons

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It's a fragile existence at Mount Edziza for all but the hardiest plants.

Matt J. Simmons

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Lava flows, frozen in time, at Mount Edziza.

Matt J. Simmons

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The trail carved into the grass was trekked by native people in search of obsidian thousands of years ago.

Matt J. Simmons

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With no roads into Mount Edziza, visitors explore on foot.

Matt J. Simmons

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The sun sparkles over a volcanic peak. Glacier-covered peaks at Mount Edziza are visible 40 kilometres away.

Matt J. Simmons

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Sunrise over Mount Edziza.

Matt J. Simmons

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Setting up camp before the sun sets on Mount Edziza.

Matt J. Simmons

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Tenchen Glacier at Mount Edziza.

Matt J. Simmons

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Hiking the Red Ridge near the Tenchen Glacier at Mount Edziza.

Matt J. Simmons

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The plateau at Mount Edziza in the Stikine region of northwestern B.C.

Matt J. Simmons

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A backpacker walks through cow parsley at Mount Edziza.

Matt J. Simmons

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Caribou, grizzly and black bears, foxes, wolves, moose, bighorn sheep and mountain goats make their home at Mount Edziza.

Matt J. Simmons

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Mount Edziza: a hiker's paradise.

Matt J. Simmons

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