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African penguins receive valentines from biologist Crystal Crimbchin at The California Academy of Sciences African penguin exhibit in San Francisco. The valentines will be used as nesting material.

Jeff Chiu/AP

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An Indian man climbs on a high pole to help exile Tibetans tie a string of multicolored flags printed with Buddhist prayers on the third and one of the most important days of the Tibetan new year in Dharmsala, India.

Ashwini Bhatia/AP

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Authorities stand at a burnt out cabin near Angelus Oaks, California where police believe they engaged in a shootout with fugitive former Los Angeles police officer Christopher Dorner on Tuesday. Dorner, a fugitive ex-cop accused of a grudge-fueled killing spree targeting police officers and their families, is believed to have died in the mountain cabin that burned down in the climax to a massive weeklong manhunt across Southern California, authorities said on Wednesday.

GENE BLEVINS/REUTERS

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A worker carries an armload of red roses at Winston Flowers in Boston, Massachusetts the day before Valentine's Day. According to Winston Flowers, they will deliver 350,000 roses on Valentine's Day.

BRIAN SNYDER/REUTERS

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A cyclist makes his way through the snow in Dresden, eastern Germany.

Oliver Killig/AP

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A man takes a picture beneath trees decorated with red lanterns celebrating Chinese new year at a park in Beijing. The Lunar New Year, or Spring Festival, begun on February 10 and marked the start of the Year of the Snake, according to the Chinese zodiac.

KIM KYUNG-HOON/REUTERS

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The Rev. Ethan Jewett, with Saint Clement's Episcopal Church, places ash on Tracey Dougherty's forehead in front of a Starbucks Coffee at the corner of Chestnut and 19th Streets in Philadelphia. Ash Wednesday marks the beginning of Lent, a time when Christians prepare for Easter through acts of penitence and prayer. Jewett said he placed ash on just over 600 worshiper's foreheads.

Matt Rourke/AP

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Hindu holy men make offerings to the fire as they chant mantras to be initiated as 'Naga sadhus' or naked Hindu holy men at the Maha Kumbh festival in Allahabad, India. The significance of nakedness is that one will not have any worldly ties to material belongings, even something as simple as clothes. Rituals that transform selected holy men to Naga can only be done at the Kumbh festival.

Saurabh Das/AP

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