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Boys try to coax a reluctant ram into the Atlantic Ocean at dawn, as residents wash their sacrificial sheep in preparation for the Eid al-Adha feast, in Dakar, Senegal. The Eid al-Adha festival, known locally as Tabaski, celebrates Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son.

Rebecca Blackwell/AP

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Members of the crowd are reflected in a teleprompter as they listen to U.S. Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney deliver a speech on the U.S. economy while campaigning in Ames, Iowa.

BRIAN SNYDER/REUTERS

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A fisherman pulls his net out of the water during sunset at the village of Habaniya, 85 km west of Baghdad.

SAAD SHALASH/REUTERS

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A firefighter walks through the little village of Mormanno, next to Cosenza in Italy, as he patrols after an earthquake. A magnitude 5 earthquake struck north of Cosenza in southern Italy early on Friday, and police said a hospital had been evacuated after cracks were found in its structure, but there were no reports of injuries.

STRINGER/ITALY/REUTERS

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Syrian displaced children run after a truck loaded with presents for Eid Al-Adha in a refugee camp near Atma, Idlib province, Syria. A powerful car bomb exploded in Damascus and scattered fighting broke out in several areas across Syria Friday, quickly dashing any hopes that a shaky holiday cease-fire would hold for four days.

Manu Brabo/AP

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People walk on a street littered with debris after Hurricane Sandy hit Santiago de Cuba. The Cuban government said on Thursday night that 11 people died when the storm barrelled across the island, most killed by falling trees or in building collapses in Santiago de Cuba province and neighbouring Guantanamo province.

DESMOND BOYLAN/REUTERS

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Muslim women offer a special prayer at a shrine on the eve of the Eid al-Adha festival on the outskirts of the western Indian city of Ahmedabad. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Adha by sacrificial slaughtering of sheep, goats, cows and camels to commemorate Prophet Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son Ismail on God's command.

AMIT DAVE/REUTERS

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A Syrian refugee boy points a plastic toy pistol at a man in a Mickey Mouse costume on the first day of Eid al-Adha at a park in Beirut. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Adha, marking the end of the haj, by slaughtering sheep, goats, cows and camels to commemorate Prophet Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son Ismail on God's command.

JAMAL SAIDI/REUTERS

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Friends and family reflect over the casket of the Honourable Lincoln Alexander in Hamilton. Alexander was Ontario's 24th lieutenant governor.

Nathan Denette/THE CANADIAN PRESS

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Afghan children sit on a carnival ride during Eid al-Adha in Kabul. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Adha to mark the end of the haj pilgrimage by slaughtering sheep, goats, camels and cows to commemorate Prophet Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son, Ismail, on God's command.

MOHAMMAD ISMAIL/REUTERS

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Muslim pilgrims arrive to cast stones at pillars symbolising Satan, as part of a haj pilgrimage rite, on the first day of Eid al-Adha in Mena, near the holy city of Mecca. Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Adha to mark the end of the Haj by slaughtering sheep, goats, cows and camels to commemorate Prophet Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son Ismail on God's command.

AMR ABDALLAH DALSH/REUTERS

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