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The Globe and Mail

Moments: Caught on Camera, March 4 to March 8

One captivating image a day, the reason it was chosen and how you can shoot similar pictures

1 of 5

A girl sits with an Irish Wolfhound during the first day of the Crufts Dog Show in Birmingham, central England. WHY WE PICKED IT: The photographer’s framing – showing just the girl’s legs and feet – makes this picture. Keep framing in mind when composing your images.

Darren Staples/REUTERS

2 of 5

A swan swims in the early spring sun at the inner city harbour in Berlin. WHY WE PICKED IT:A simple scene – a swan in the water – elevated by rich colours, textures and shapes. All it took was looking for a different angle and paying attention to the shape created by the wings and the contrast of the white feathers on the dark water.

Markus Schreiber/AP PHOTO

3 of 5

Northern Ontario third, Ryan Fry, peers through the arms of his teams sweepers as he makes a shot during the afternoon draw against Alberta at the Tim Hortons Brier in Edmonton, Alta. WHY WE PICKED IT: By using at long lens and shallow depth of field the photographer guides you to the eye of the curler. Great action shot and shows the intense concentration of the athletes.

Jonathan Hayward/THE CANADIAN PRESS

4 of 5

A mural in the Bogside area of Derry City depicts a petrol bomber during the Battle of the Bogside which took place in 1969 between residents of the area and the Royal Ulster Constabulary. WHY WE PICKED IT: Two techniques make this photo stand out: the night exposure that highlights the mural, and the slow shutter speed that blurs the cars in the foreground into streaks of light.

Cathal McNaughton/REUTERS

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5 of 5

Sarah chose this hydrant because it's the older style with lots of detail, is weathered, and it sits on a bit of a pedestal on the sidewalk. She shot this on a cloudy evening with a high ISO and no flash almost lying on the sidewalk. WHY WE PICKED IT: The low angle brings a new perspective to a mundane object making it more interesting.

Sarah M. Jordan

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