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Globe Photojournalist Deborah Baic's favorite images

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Sault Ste. Marie, Jan. 03/09 - Ice fishers set up their fishing gear on Havilland Bay on the shores of Lake Superior just north of Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada. There can be as many as 200 shacks scattering the bay turning into a mini village on the ice during high ice fishing season.

Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

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August 22/09 - Grandson Colby Pellerine rubs his eye with his blanket while his grandparents Fielding Smith, a former employee of Trentonworks Railcar Plant in Trenton, Nova Scotia, Canada, and Robby Smith look on at their home in Springville. The company went bankrupt leaving the employee pension underfunded by as much as 30% as well as loosing their health benefits. The couple call their grandson the "shine of their lives" and can no longer buy him all the things they used to buy. Photo By Deborah Baic The Globe and Mail

Deborah Baic/Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

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Toronto, 29/03/11 - Fred Peters, Management and Financial Consultant poses for a photo in downtown Toronto, Ontario, Canada. There���s an unspoken elephant in the room whenever Fred Peters interviews for a job. Even though it's illegal for interviewers to ask his age, he knows it is on their mind. ���I���ve found you have to deal with the age factor up front, ��� says Mr. Peters, who is 63 and until 2008 was chief financial officer of the now-defunct software maker Digital Fairway Corp. Photo By Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

Deborah Baic/Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

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Toronto July 16/2010 - Amar Patel, who is suffering from breast cancer, lies in bed in her apartment in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Patel is in a dispute with The Bank of Nova Scotia over some holdings she wishes to redeem from the bank. Photo By Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail Story details: In the end, nothing else would do for Bank of Nova Scotia but that Amar Patel - 73 years old, bald from chemotherapy, in the throes of metastatic breast cancer - should drag her aching bones down to the bank's head office in downtown Toronto. The trip from her airy apartment above the Indian Rice Factory, the landmark restaurant she founded in 1970 and has run ever since, was an agony of no fewer than five transfers - from the hospital bed in her living room to a commode, from commode to the chair lift for the first set of stairs, from that chair to the next chair lift for the second set, from that chair to a walker, from walker to the car. This exercise took 59 minutes and the best efforts of her son Aman, daughter-in-law Deepa and restaurant employee Chandan Sindhwal. All she wanted was to do was take delivery of the silver the bank was holding for her in the form of the certificates she'd bought decades earlier.

Deborah Baic/Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

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Jacmel, Feb. 18/10 - Children play in the yard of the Abri Pwovizwa Shelter Camp in Jacmel, Haiti. The group of families, some 500 homeless people are staying in the yard of a church/ health clinic in the neighbourhood their houses are in to stay close to whatever is left of their homes and have developed a small government to deal with food, water, security, children and other everyday life needs.

Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

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Jacmel, 27/07/10 - A white dove tied to a string hides under the remnants of a home in Jacmel, Haiti almost six months after the earthquake that ricked the country.

Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

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Jacmel, Feb. 21/10 - Several hundred people marched through the streets of Jacmel, Haiti in a symmbolic cross town crusade winding it's way past several earthquake collapsed buildings, rubble and garbage as they say and prayed in harmony. Photo By Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

Deborah Baic/Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

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Titanyen, January 12/2011 - A man walks through rows of black un-named crosses at St. Christophe, where some 150,000 victims were buried in a mass grave, victims of the January 12/2010 earthquake that rocked the poor and struggling country killing between two and three hundred thousand people. Photo By Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

Deborah Baic/By Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

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Jacmel, July 02/2010 - The pediatric ward built from wood at St. Michel Hospital in Jacmel, Haiti by Doctors Without Borders, but is the only hospital in the South East District which has a population of approximately 500,000 people. ***For Health Story*** Photo By Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

Deborah Baic/Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

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Port-au-Prince, January 09/2011 - A group of people including some young boys pick through smoking garbage and piles of rubble dumped on the side of the road in Port-au-Prince almost one year after the earthquake that rocked the country. Photo By Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

Deborah Baic/Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

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Feb. 12/09 - Jean McFins and her sister Jedus McFins stand in front of their tent in Pinchinat Soccer Feild Tent City for Internally Displaced Persons in Jacmel, Haiti, where they have been living in the 30 days since the earthquake that devastated Haiti.

Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

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Jacmel, Feb. 20/10 - A boy plays on the rocks at sunset in Celine Beach in Jacmel, Haiti. Photo By Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

Deborah Baic/Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

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Port-au-Prince, January 10/2011 - A line of pregnant women who are in labour wait for a bed to open up to deliver their babies at Isail Jeanty Maternity Hospital run by Medecins sans Frontieres in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The hospital, also called the baby factory delivers approximately 50 babies a day with the healthy mothers and babies having a 6 to 7 hour turn around in the hospital. Photo By Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

Deborah Baic/Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

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Port-au-Prince, January 10/2011 - This little newborn baby, who has no name and has cholera, is being treated on cholera maternity ward at Isail Jeanty Maternity Hospital run by Medecins sans Frontieres in Port-au-Prince, Haiti three months ago. The hospital, also called the baby factory delivers approximately 50 babies a day with the healthy mothers and babies having a 6 to 7 hour turn around in the hospital. Photo By Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

Deborah Baic/Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

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Jacmel, June 16/2010 - Students play outside and in classroom at a national public school in Jacmel, Haiti, where members of IMA World Health pass out medication to students to fight against parasite infection. Photo By Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

Deborah Baic/Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

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Jacmel, June 25/2010 - A baby sits in a tub in between the old army tents being used by some 1000 families in the displaced person camp of Pinchinat in Jacmel, Haiti, six months after people were located there during the emergency faze following the earthquake. Relocating the homeless people living there and at the many other sites in Jacmel continues to be a problem.

Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

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Jacmel, Feb. 18/10 - Children play in the yard of the Abri Pwovizwa Shelter Camp in Jacmel, Haiti. The group of families, some 500 homeless people are staying in the yard of a church/ health clinic in the neighbourhood their houses are in to stay close to whatever is left of their homes and have developed a small government to deal with food, water, security, children and other everyday life needs.

Deborah Baic/The Globe and Mail

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