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In photos: Behind the scenes at B.C. taxidermy shops

For a craft that relies on the dead, taxidermy is thriving surprisingly well, even in this age of instant, multidimensional imaging.

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LaVerne Holmes sits among his work at his shop in Mill Bay, B.C. Mr. Holmes has been a taxidermist for over 25 years.

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Terry Woodworth, who spent 25 years in the infantry division of the Canadian army, now runs Lagoon Taxidermy in Colwood on Vancouver Island, and his skill at restoring a life-like appearance to long dead wildlife is in high demand.

Chad Hipolito/The Globe and Mail

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Scott Barley uses an air brush to add detail around a bear’s nose.

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Glass eyes are collected to be used for birds, mammals and some reptiles.

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In the end, the California quail ends up in the lynx's mouth as part of the overall piece.

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A Russian brown bear destined for a museum in Chemainus, B.C., looks over Terry as he stretches out a hyena hide.

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LaVerne Holmes, left, and Terry Woodworth have nearly 50 years of taxidermy experience between them.

Chad Hipolito/The Globe and Mail

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