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In Pictures: Hints of human history in Haida Gwaii

New discoveries show humans settled the Americas some 5,000 years earlier than previously thought – and the actual timeframe may go back even further. These Canadian researchers are digging for clues to the past

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The Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve and Haida Heritage Site, as seen from a float plane, July 5, 2012.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

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Captain Gold with a youth group in the Gwaii Haanas National Park, July 5, 2012.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

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Quentin Mackie, a University of Victoria professor conducting research in the Gwaii Haanas National Park, makes his way to a site with wooden stakes used as a fishing weirs, July 5, 2012.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

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Captain Gold at the entrance to a native longhouse in the Gwaii Haanas National Park, July 5, 2012.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

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Captain Gold with a youth group in the Gwaii Haanas National Park, July 5, 2012.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

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Jenny Cohen, a University of Victoria student helping with research in the Gwaii Haanas National Park, looks over wooden stakes used as a fishing weirs, July 5, 2012.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

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Wooden stakes used as a fishing weirs in the Gwaii Haanas National Park, July 5, 2012.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

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Gwaliga Hart, a Haida student, helps on a dig and with research in the Gwaii Haanas National Park, July 5, 2012.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

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Nathalie Macfarlane, director and curator of the Haida Gwaii Museum, holds up a 14,000-year-old bear skull, July 5, 2012.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

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Quentin Mackie, a University of Victoria professor conducting research in the Gwaii Haanas National Park , holds a stone tool, July 5, 2012.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

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