Skip to main content

The Globe and Mail

In pictures: Petroglyph returned home to first nations

The boulder, measuring approximately three by five feet and weighing about six tonnes, was found on the east bank of the Fraser River near Crow’s Bar, B.C. back in 1926 by prospector H.S. Brown. It took a team of 10 horses a month to drag the boulder from the sandbar along the Fraser River up the 3,000 foot ascent to the railhead near Clinton. After years of being in Stanley Park in an unsheltered area where it was subject to vandalism, the Park Board and the Museum agreed to donate and move the rock to Museum of Vancouver in 1992 -- 86 years later the rock finally made its way home again. John Lehmann, the Globe and Mail's Vancouver based staff photographer, was there as the rock made the journey home.

1 of 11

A member of the Stswecemc Xgattem First Nation during a blessing ceremony at the Museum of Vancouver June 12, 2012 before the rock is moved to its new location at Churn Creek.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

2 of 11

A member of the Stswecemc Xgattem First Nation during a blessing ceremony at the Museum of Vancouver June 12, 2012 before the rock is moved to its new location at Churn Creek.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

3 of 11

The ancient petroglyph at the Museum of Vancouver June 12, 2012 before the rock is moved to its new location at Churn Creek.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

4 of 11

Movers prepare the ancient petroglyph at the Museum of Vancouver June 12, 2012 before the rock is moved to its new location at Churn Creek.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

Story continues below advertisement

5 of 11

Native elders from the Stswecemc Xgattem First Nation watch as movers prepare the ancient petroglyph at the Museum of Vancouver June 12, 2012 before the rock is moved to its new location at Churn Creek.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

6 of 11

A procession of people lead a rock with a petroglyph to its new home in the Churn Creek Protected Area June 13, 2012 near the site where it was taken from in 1926. The rock which was removed and taken to Vancouver was repatriated back to the Secwepemc traditional territory west of Clinton, BC from the Museum of Vancouver.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

7 of 11

Native youth ride on a truck carrying a petroglyph as the rock makes its way to its new home in the Churn Creek Protected Area June 13, 2012 near the site where it was taken from in 1926. The rock which was removed and taken to Vancouver was repatriated back to the Secwepemc traditional territory west of Clinton, BC from the Museum of Vancouver.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

8 of 11

Crowd gathers around an ancient petroglyph rock during a ceremony after it was placed on to its new home in the Churn Creek Protected Area June 13, 2012 near the site where it was taken from in 1926. The rock which was removed and taken to Vancouver was repatriated back to the Secwepemc traditional territory west of Clinton, BC from the Museum of Vancouver.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

9 of 11

Crowds gather to watch as rock with a petroglyph is lowered on to its new home in the Churn Creek Protected Area June 13, 2012 near the site where it was taken from in 1926. The rock which was removed and taken to Vancouver was repatriated back to the Secwepemc traditional territory west of Clinton, BC from the Museum of Vancouver.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

10 of 11

A rock with a petroglyph is lowered on to its new home in the Churn Creek Protected Area June 13, 2012 near the site where it was taken from in 1926. The rock which was removed and taken to Vancouver was repatriated back to the Secwepemc traditional territory west of Clinton, BC from the Museum of Vancouver.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

11 of 11

Elder Ron Ignace from the Skeetchestn Nation performs a smudging ceremony June 13, 2012 after an ancient petroglyph was placed in the Churn Creek Protected Area near the site where it was taken from in 1926. The rock which was removed and taken to Vancouver's was repatriated back to the Secwepemc traditional territory west of Clinton, BC from the Museum of Vancouver.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

Report an error
Combined Shape Created with Sketch.

Combined Shape Created with Sketch.

Thank you!

You are now subscribed to the newsletter at

You can unsubscribe from this newsletter or Globe promotions at any time by clicking the link at the bottom of the newsletter, or by emailing us at privacy@globeandmail.com.