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Invermere, B.C., residents support deer cull, unofficially

A herd of deer shown grazing on a residential lawn in Cranbrook, B.C., in 2008.

Courtesy City of Cranbrook

Aggressive deer could soon be dead deer in southeastern B.C.'s District of Invermere.

Results of a non-binding weekend referendum on the culling of deer are still unofficial, but the tally posted on the district's website shows overwhelming support for the use of lethal measures when Bambi goes bad.

Of the 994 people who voted, 749 approved the use of culls to control populations of urban deer.

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The vote comes just days after the B.C. Supreme Court rejected a civil suit launched by the Invermere Deer Protection Society, which argued Invermere's plans for a cull should be shelved because the district did not adequately consult with voters.

Several communities around B.C., including the Kootenay cities of Cranbrook and Kimberley, have been watching the court case and referendum closely because they use a similar process when applying for provincial permits to conduct deer culls.

Habituated deer are blamed for damaging gardens and infrastructure and have also threatened, chased and attacked pets and people during mating season or when protecting their young.

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