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Three people who were at Martin Luther King's famous speech put his words into action

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Water fountains that once segregated races are now museum pieces in Jackson.

Melanie Thortis/The Globe and Mail

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Protesters at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where about 250,000 people peacefully demonstrated, on Aug. 28, 1963.

Carl T. Gossett Jr./The New York Times

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Ineva May-Pittman visits Jackson monument to Medgar Evers.

Melanie Thortis/The Globe and Mail

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Frankye Adams-Johnson went to Washington at 17 .

Melanie Thortis/The Globe and Mail

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Frankye Adams Johnson at a civil-rights demonstration in Jackson in May, 1963, when she was only 17.

Courtesy of Frankye Adams Johnson

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Owen Brooks gave up his job as a designer of military radar,

Melanie Thortis/The Globe and Mail

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Freedom Corner honours Medgar Evers and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and is located at the intersection of the roads that bear their names in Jackson, Miss.

Melanie Thortis/The Globe and Mail

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Only Mississippi’s state flag still includes the contentious Confederate emblem.

Melanie Thortis/The Globe and Mail

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