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The Globe and Mail

Carbon capture leak forces Saskatchewan couple to leave farm

Pair abandon Saskatchewan farm because of blowouts, dead animals and algae

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Cameron Kerr, left, and his wife Jane are shown at their home in Regina on Tuesday, Jan. 11, 2011, in Regina, Sask. A Saskatchewan farm couple whose land lies over the world's largest carbon capture and storage project says greenhouse gases that were supposed to have been injected permanently underground are leaking out, killing animals and sending groundwater foaming to the surface like shaken-up soda pop.

TROY FLEECE/Troy Fleece/The Canadian Press

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Active foaming is shown on a farm in Weyburn, Sask. in this Nov. 2005 photo, released on Tuesday Jan. 11, 2011 by the owner's lawyer. A Saskatchewan farm couple whose land lies over the world's largest carbon capture and storage project says greenhouse gases that were supposed to have been injected permanently underground are leaking out, killing animals and sending groundwater foaming to the surface like shaken-up soda pop.

Handout/The Canadian Press

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A cat carcass is shown on a Weyburn, Sask. farm in this August 2005 handout photo, released on Tuesday Jan. 11, 2011 by the owner's lawyer. A Saskatchewan farm couple whose land lies over the world's largest carbon capture and storage project says greenhouse gases that were supposed to have been injected permanently underground are leaking out, killing animals and sending groundwater foaming to the surface like shaken-up soda pop.

Handout/The Canadian Press

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A silver blue film covering water is shown on a Weyburn, Sask. farm in this Sept 25, 2009 handout photo, released on Tuesday Jan. 11, 2011 by the owner's lawyer. A Saskatchewan farm couple whose land lies over the world's largest carbon capture and storage project says greenhouse gases that were supposed to have been injected permanently underground are leaking out, killing animals and sending groundwater foaming to the surface like shaken-up soda pop.

Handout/The Canadian Press

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An algae bloom is shown on a Weyburn, Sask. farm pond in this July 22, 2009 handout photo, released on Tuesday Jan. 11, 2011 by the owner's lawyer. A Saskatchewan farm couple whose land lies over the world's largest carbon capture and storage project says greenhouse gases that were supposed to have been injected permanently underground are leaking out, killing animals and sending groundwater foaming to the surface like shaken-up soda pop.

Handout/The Canadian Press

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An algae bloom is shown on a Weyburn, Sask. farm pond in this April 2005 handout photo, released on Tuesday Jan. 11, 2011 by the owner's lawyer. A Saskatchewan farm couple whose land lies over the world's largest carbon capture and storage project says greenhouse gases that were supposed to have been injected permanently underground are leaking out, killing animals and sending groundwater foaming to the surface like shaken-up soda pop.

Handout/The Canadian Press

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A dead bird lies on the soil on a Weyburn, Sask. farm in this Aug 30, 2006 handout photo, released on Tuesday Jan. 11, 2011 by the owner's lawyer. A Saskatchewan farm couple whose land lies over the world's largest carbon capture and storage project says greenhouse gases that were supposed to have been injected permanently underground are leaking out, killing animals and sending groundwater foaming to the surface like shaken-up soda pop.

Handout/The Canadian Press

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Foam bubbles in a soil pit on a Weyburn, Sask. farm in this Nov 12, 2007 handout photo, released on Tuesday Jan. 11, 2011 by the owner's lawyer. A Saskatchewan farm couple whose land lies over the world's largest carbon capture and storage project says greenhouse gases that were supposed to have been injected permanently underground are leaking out, killing animals and sending groundwater foaming to the surface like shaken-up soda pop.

Handout/The Canadian Press

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Foam forms under a layer of ice in a pond on a Weyburn, Sask. farm in this Nov. 2005 handout photo, released on Tuesday Jan. 11, 2011 by the owner's lawyer. A Saskatchewan farm couple whose land lies over the world's largest carbon capture and storage project says greenhouse gases that were supposed to have been injected permanently underground are leaking out, killing animals and sending groundwater foaming to the surface like shaken-up soda pop.

Handout/The Canadian Press

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A sign at the EnCana Central Receiving Terminal located outside of Weyburn, Sask. where they receive the CO2 from North Dakota on Monday, June 8, 2009. Saskatchewan is at the forefront of efforts to capture carbon dioxide gas and keep it out of the atmosphere.

Troy Fleece/Troy Fleece/The Canadian Press

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