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Others who have faced controversy and corruption allegations in Quebec

1 of 13

Marc Bellemare: The former Liberal Justice minister who triggered a public inquiry after accusing Premier Jean Charest of allowing party fundraisers to influence the nomination of judges in 2003-2004.

Jacques Boissinot/Jacques Boissinot/The Canadian Press

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Franco Fava (right): A Liberal Party fundraiser who, Mr. Bellemare alleged, influenced the nomination of judges and other senior government appointments. He denied the charges at the inquiry, headed by former Supreme Court justice Michel Bastarache.

Jacques Boissinot/Jacques Boissinot/The Canadian Press

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Charles Rondeau: Another Quebec City fundraiser, who, Mr. Bellemare told the inquiry, had met regularly with senior Charest staffer Chantal Landry to get Liberal supporters appointed to government jobs, including judicial nominations. He has denied the allegations at the inquiry.

Jacques Boissinot/Jacques Boissinot /The Canadian Press

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David Whissell: A former Quebec Labour minister who resigned from the Charest cabinet over an alleged conflict of interest involving his part ownership in a paving company that received government contracts without public tenders.

JACQUES BOISSINOT/Jacques Boissinot/The Canadian Press

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Tony Tomassi: A former Quebec Family minister who resigned from cabinet after it was revealed he used a credit card belonging to a private security firm that received government contracts. The resignation came amid allegations he allocated day-care permits to Liberal Party supporters.

Jacques Boissinot/Jacques Boissinot/The Canadian Press

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Louigi Coretti (not pictured): Owner of the Canadian Bureau of Investigations and Adjustments, the now bankrupt security firm at the centre of the scandal that led to Mr. Tomassi’s (pictured) resignation. Despite two bankruptcies, Mr. Coretti received $4-million in 2008 from the province’s regional development fund. He contributed $6,500 to the Quebec Liberal Party over the preceding three years.

Jacques Boissinot/Jacques Boissinot/The Canadian Press

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Jacques Dupuis: The former minister of Public Security, accused by opposition parties of helping Mr. Coretti obtain a permit to carry a firearm. Mr. Dupuis, who knew Mr. Coretti through the Liberal Party, has denied intervening on the gun permit. Mr. Dupuis quit politics last June.

Jacques Boissinot/Jacques Boissinot/The Canadian Press

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Nic Rizzuto: The head of the Montreal organized crime family until his assassination this week. The Rizzuto family is reported to have extorted millions from construction companies. The so-called “fabulous 14,” Quebec’s largest construction firms, were reported to be paying 5 per cent of all construction contracts – the equivalent of about $500,000 a month – to the family in return for control over the awarding of building projects, including government contracts.

GRAHAM HIGHES/Graham Hughes/The Canadian Press

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Tony Accurso: A prominent Montreal construction entrepreneur who is under investigation by Revenue Canada for tax evasion. He was at centre of a controversy when it was revealed that labour leaders and municipal politicians took cruises on his yacht. His construction companies received municipal government contracts including five from the Montreal borough of Anjou between 2006 and 2009 worth $6.2-million.

ANDRE PICHETTE/Andre Pichette

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Gilles Vaillancourt: The Mayor of Laval has been accused of attempting to make illegal cash contributions to two elected officials. Bloc Québécois MP Serge Ménard said Mr. Vaillancourt offered an envelope containing $10,000 when he was a Parti Québécois candidate in a 1993 provincial by-election. Liberal MNA Vincent Auclair said Mr. Vaillancourt also offered him cash during a 2002 provincial by-election. Mr. Vaillancourt denied the allegations and threatens to sue both.

Ryan Remiorz/Ryan Remiorz/The Canadian Press

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Richard Marcotte: The mayor of Mascouche, just north of Montreal, stepped down pending a Ministry of Municipal Affairs investigation into a potential conflict of interest involving the awarding of $40-million in contracts to construction entrepreneur Normand Trudel between 2000 and 2009. Mr. Trudel denied the allegations.

Francois Roy/Francois Roy/The Canadian Press

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Richard Marcotte: The mayor of Mascouche (pictured), just north of Montreal, stepped down pending a Ministry of Municipal Affairs investigation into a potential conflict of interest involving the awarding of $40-million in contracts to construction entrepreneur Normand Trudel between 2000 and 2009. Mr. Trudel denied the allegations.

ANDY TULLIS/Andy Tullis/The Associated Press

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Jacques Duchesneau: The former Montreal chief of police who was hired to operate an anti-corruption squad at the Ministry of Transportation to eliminate bid-rigging in the tendering process of government contracts is alleged to have taken illegal campaign contributions in the 1998 Montreal mayoralty race. Mr. Duchesneau denied the charges and has temporarily stepped down from the anti-corruption squad until the province’s Chief Electoral officer completes an investigation.

Louie Palu/Louie Palu/The Globe and Mail

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