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Heather Payne, top , in green, one of the founders of Ladies Learning Code, works with two young girls, Carol Sosin Tineo, 11, in glasses, and Emika Hall, 10, in white during a code writing exercise as part of the Girls Learning Code one-day workshop.

Peter Power/The Globe and Mail

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Young girls work on laptops around a table, learning to write code during a visit to Mozilla.

Peter Power/The Globe and Mail

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Shawn Konopinsky, CEO, Partner of Nascent, helps a young girl demonstrate how hard the glass material is on the Microsoft Surface. His company did the software for this and the new generation Surface.

Peter Power/The Globe and Mail

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Shawn Konopinsky, CEO, Partner of Nascent, conducts a "hands on" demonstration of the Microsoft Surface.

Peter Power/The Globe and Mail

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Encouraging girls to maintain their enthusiasm for math, science and technology can prevent them from dropping these subjects in high school.

Peter Power/The Globe and Mail

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Becoming creators rather than simply consumers of software helps girls see the career possibilities in technology.

Peter Power/The Globe and Mail

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Laura Plant, top right, the Director of Ladies Learning Code, participates in a "hands on" demonstration of the Microsoft Surface.

Peter Power/The Globe and Mail

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