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The Titanic just prior to being launched into the River Lagan for towing to a fitting-out berth where her engines, funnels and interiors would be installed, May 31, 1911.

REUTERS/George Grantham Bain Collection/Library of Congress/REUTERS/George Grantham Bain Collection/Library of Congress

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The Titanic is launched into the River Lagan for towing to a fitting-out berth where her engines, funnels and interiors would be installed, May 31, 1911.

REUTERS/George Grantham Bain Collection/Library of Congress/REUTERS/George Grantham Bain Collection/Library of Congress

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This May 31, 1911 photo provided by the Library of Congress, shows the hull of the S.S. Titanic. under construction in dry dock. The tragic sinking of the Titanic nearly a century ago can be blamed on low grade rivets that the ship's builders used on some parts of the ill-fated liner, two experts on metals conclude in a new book.

AP Photo/Library of Congress/AP Photo/Library of Congress

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In this April 10, 1912 file photo, the Titanic departs Southampton, England on its maiden Atlantic voyage. April 15, 2012 is the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic, just five days after it left Southampton on its maiden voyage to New York.

AP Photo/AP Photo

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In this April 1912 file photo, crowds gather around the bulletin board of the New York American newspaper in New York, where the names of people rescued from the sinking Titanic are displayed. It was a news story that would change the news. From the moment that a brief Associated Press dispatch relayed the wireless distress call _ "Titanic ... reported having struck an iceberg. The steamer said that immediate assistance was required" _ reporters and editors scrambled.

AP Photo/AP Photo

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In this 1912 photo made available by the Library of Congress, Harold Bride, surviving wireless operator of the Titanic, with feet bandaged, is carried up the ramp of a ship.

AP Photo/Library of Congress/AP Photo/Library of Congress

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A boat from the ship MacKay-Bennett examines an overturned lifeboat from the Titanic in waters of the Atlantic in 1912.

REUTERS/Courtesy of Dalhousie University Archives and Special Collections, Halifax, N.S. Thomas Head/REUTERS/Courtesy of Dalhousie University Archives and Special Collections, Halifax, N.S. Thomas Head Raddall Fonds

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Coffins for the recovered bodies from the Titanic are seen in Halifax in 1912. Of the 2,223 passengers and crew aboard, only 706 survived that memorable night, but the story of the ocean liner deemed unsinkable has fascinated the world ever since.

REUTERS/Courtesy of Dalhousie University Archives and Special Collections, Halifax, N.S. Dalhousie U/REUTERS/Courtesy of Dalhousie University Archives and Special Collections, Halifax, N.S. Dalhousie University Photograph Collect

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Titanic lifeboats on their way to the Carpathia following the sinking of the Titanic April 15, 1912. The Titanic was considered unsinkable but foundered in frigid Atlantic waters off Newfoundland after striking an iceberg.

REUTERS/George Grantham Bain Collection/Library of Congres/REUTERS/George Grantham Bain Collection/Library of Congres

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A group of survivors of the Titanic disaster aboard the Carpathia after being rescued, April 1912.

REUTERS/George Grantham Bain Collection/Library of Congress/REUTERS/George Grantham Bain Collection/Library of Congress

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A group of survivors of the Titanic disaster aboard the Carpathia after being rescued, April 1912.

REUTERS/Library of Congress/REUTERS/Library of Congress

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A crowd in New York awaiting survivors from the Titanic to arrive aboard the Carpathia following the sinking of the Titanic, April 18, 1912.

REUTERS/George Grantham Bain Collection/Library of Congress/REUTERS/George Grantham Bain Collection/Library of Congress

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Child survivors of Titanic sinking, April 1912. Michel and Edmond, ages four and two, better known as the 'Titanic Orphans' were the only children rescued from the Titanic without a parent or guardian. The children, who spoke no English, were cared for by first-class French-speaking passenger Margaret Hays until their mother was located in France. Their father placed the two in the last lifeboat successfully launched from the Titanic.

REUTERS/George Grantham Bain Collection/Library of Congress/REUTERS/George Grantham Bain Collection/Library of Congress

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Edmond and Michel Navratil, of Nice, France, on their mother Marcelle's lap after being reunited with her, 1912. Michel and Edmond, ages four and two, better known as the 'Titanic Orphans' were the only children rescued from the Titanic without a parent or guardian. The children, who spoke no English, were cared for by first-class French-speaking passenger Margaret Hays until their mother was located in France. Their father placed the two in the last lifeboat successfully launched from the Titanic.

REUTERS/Library of Congress/REUTERS/Library of Congress

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An iceberg, presumed to have been the one that collided with the Titanic in pictured from the deck of the cable ship Mackay-Bennett in April 1912.

John R Snow and William Snow/John R Snow and William Snow

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