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In photos: Family and the football team keep Grande Prairie teen crash victims close

But the town’s school board is working to scrub away reminders of the crash, calling in a trauma expert who had worked at Columbine High School in Colorado, where 13 people were killed in a shooting rampage in 1999, and Bathurst High in New Brunswick, which lost seven students and an adult in a van crash in 2008.

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The week after the crash, the Warriors of Grande Prairie, Alta., returned to the field for this moment of silence – and a game that was broadcast on TSN. Now, the spotlight has moved on.

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After the fatal crash, the Grande Prairie football team went on a winning streak, clinching its regional championship. Players wrote the numbers of their fallen teammates on their socks.

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At the crash site, photos memorialize Tanner Hildebrand, left, Vince Stover, Matthew Deller and Walter Borden-Wilkins.

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Tanner Hildebrand’s mother, Connie Hildebrand-Strong, consistently wears Warriors gear clothing she had bearing her son’s image. She had decals made with Tanner’s face for her truck and motorcycle too. “I told my kids, no one else can go, because I’ve got nothing else to paint,” she said.

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

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“I still miss Walter so much, it just tears me up inside,” Holly Borden said about her son, Walter Borden-Wilkins.

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Jenny Wilson holds a photo of her son Vince Stover.

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Desiree Judd and son Zach.

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Jenny Wilson has a tattoo on her right arm to memorialize her son Vincent Stover. She also wears a necklace with his picture and some of his ashes.

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Leon Deller, seen with a photo of his son Matthew, finds it difficult to follow the court case of the driver charged in the crash. ‘It’s a real shame how the world has gone so far to the fact that you can’t stand up and be a man and just admit to what you did wrong.’

John Lehmann/The Globe and Mail

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Crosses for the four victims remained along the roadside.

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Zach Judd visits the crash site for the first time.

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