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Police confirm head found in Montreal park belongs to Lin Jun

Lin Jun, a Chinese student at Concordia University.

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Police investigators have confirmed they have found the final missing body part of Lin Jun, the Concordia University foreign student who was killed in a video-recorded homicide and dismemberment at the end of May.

Investigators discovered Mr. Lin's head on Sunday in a park in the west-end Montreal neighbourhood of Angrignon. They were awaiting forensic testing, including DNA matching, to confirm the remains belonged to Mr. Lin's corpse. The confirmation came Wednesday afternoon after work was completed by the provincial police laboratory.

A computer science student from China, Mr. Lin, 33, was stabbed and dismembered in a Montreal apartment in the last week of May. The horrific crime was videotaped and Mr. Lin's limbs were mailed to two Vancouver-area schools and to the Ottawa headquarters of the Conservative and Liberal parties.

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Luka Rocco Magnotta, a 29-year-old native of the Toronto area, was arrested in Berlin last month after an international manhunt. Montreal police had pleaded with him to help locate Mr. Lin's missing head. Montreal police Constable Raphaël Bergeron said they received a tip to locate the head, but he said he could not specify who gave them the clue.

Mr. Lin's family from China was recently in Montreal and were hoping to return home with all of his remains. "What I can tell you is that the family was advised about the find and the match," Constable Bergeron said.

Mr. Magnotta was charged with first-degree murder in Mr. Lin's death. He is also charged with defiling Mr. Lin's corpse, harassing Prime Minister Stephen Harper and members of Parliament, and publishing and mailing obscene material.

He has pleaded not guilty and is scheduled for a preliminary hearing in March.

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About the Author
National correspondent

Les Perreaux joined the Montreal bureau of the Globe and Mail in 2008. He previously worked for the Canadian Press covering national and international affairs, including federal and Quebec politics and the war in Afghanistan. More

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