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In Pictures: That $40 bag of flour better make some good cookies

High-priced food has long been a fact of life in the North prompting subsidy programs meant to bring the cost of some products down. Here's a sample of what you might find in an Arctic grocery store.

1 of 10

A litre of 2% is reasonably priced at $2.79, about the same as in other parts of the country.

Maureen Doherty/The Globe and Mail

2 of 10

The $3.69 it costs for a 500g package of pasta is about 1 1/2 times more than what pasta costs in the south.

Maureen Doherty/The Globe and Mail

3 of 10

At $40.89, this 10kg bag of sugar is almost a luxury item.

Maureen Doherty/The Globe and Mail

4 of 10

This 400g box of Cheerios at $6.79 is about a buck and a half more expensive than the same box in the south.

Maureen Doherty/The Globe and Mail

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5 of 10

A dozen eggs for $2.59 is quite reasonable.

Maureen Doherty/The Globe and Mail

6 of 10

Pasta for $5.49 might be manageable, but a 12 pack of Canada Dry will run you $23.99, almost as much as a 12 pack of ale found at an Ontario Beer Store.

Maureen Doherty/The Globe and Mail

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Butter costs $6.49, about a dollar more than in the south.

Maureen Doherty/The Globe and Mail

8 of 10

Bread in the North at $4.39 is about twice as expensive bread in the south.

Maureen Doherty/The Globe and Mail

9 of 10

A can of tomato sauce in Ontario runs about $2.50 but in the North you pay twice as much.

Maureen Doherty/The Globe and Mail

10 of 10

The 10kg bag of flour at Wal-Mart in Toronto costs $11.67, much less than the same sized bag in the North.

Maureen Doherty/The Globe and Mail

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