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Although they still earn less than men, women's income is growing more quickly, according to Statistics Canada.

The total average income for Canadian women increased at almost twice the pace as that of men between 2000 and 2008, rising 13 per cent from $26,300 to $30,100. During the same period, men's salaries increased by seven per cent to $47,000.

The earnings gap is narrower among women who work full-time; they make about 71 cents for every dollar earned by their male counterparts.

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While both men and women's incomes rise with schooling, the "education premium was greater among women," Statscan said.

Women with less than a Grade 9 education earned an average of $20,800 in 2008 compared with $62,800 for those who are university educated. By contrast, men with less than Grade 9 made $40,400 compared with $91,800 for those with a university degree.

The number of dual-income households where the woman earns more than the man has increased to 29 per cent in 2008, up from just 12 per cent in 1976. However, Statistics Canada said average total income is lower in families where wives earn more than husbands, at $101,000 versus $116,400.

The overall number of dual-income households, including common-law couples, has increased substantially, from 47 per cent in 1976 to 64 per cent in 2008.

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