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Canada Advocates say Trudeau has plenty of work to do on women's rights

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau celebrating International Women's Day 2016 with his wife Sophie Gregoire-Trudeau and Finance Minister Bill Morneau (far right) along with women from his caucus.

FRED CHARTRAND/THE CANADIAN PRESS

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, who proudly calls himself a feminist, is marking International Women's Day with much fanfare.

Trudeau will begin the day by joining International Development Minister Marie-Claude Bibeau in an announcement related to the rights of women.

He will also watch as 338 young women — one for every riding in the country — take seats in the House of Commons as part of Daughters of the Vote, a program aimed at encouraging their involvement in leadership, government and politics.

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Trudeau has promised to promote gender equality and home and abroad, but advocates for the rights of women and girls say he still has a lot of work to do.

They are calling for more subsidized child care spaces, a national strategy to end gender-based violence and a new law to ensure men and women get equal pay for work of equal value.

The Liberal government has promised to bring in proactive pay equity legislation next year.

U.S. President Trump and Prime Minister Trudeau have launched a program to help boost women in business. The United States-Canada Council for the Advancement of Women Business Leaders was unveiled in a roundtable at the White House with women business executives.
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