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The Globe and Mail

In photos: The dos and don'ts of wearing religious symbols in public service workplaces in Quebec

These are part of guidelines released by the government of Quebec

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Dos and don’ts: In this image released by the Quebec government, the three examples at the top show how public employees in Quebec would be allowed to wear religious symbols in the workplace. The five below are examples of violations of the proposed rules.

Government of Quebec

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Do: This crescent and star earring is an example of how public employees in Quebec would be allowed to wear religious symbols in the workplace.

Government of Quebec

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Do: This small cross necklace is an example of how public employees in Quebec would be allowed to wear religious symbols in the workplace.

Government of Quebec

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Do: This small star of David ring is an example of how public employees in Quebec would be allowed to wear religious symbols in the workplace.

Government of Quebec

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Don’t: This large cross necklace is an example of how public employees in Quebec would not be allowed to wear religious symbols in the workplace.

Government of Quebec

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Don’t: This head scarf is an example of how public employees in Quebec would not be allowed to wear religious symbols in the workplace.

Government of Quebec

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Don’t: This turban is an example of how public employees in Quebec would not be allowed to wear religious symbols in the workplace.

Government of Quebec

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Don’t: A headscarf and face-covering veil is an example of how public employees in Quebec would not be allowed to wear religious symbols in the workplace.

Government of Quebec

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Don’t: A skullcap is an example of how public employees in Quebec would not be allowed to wear religious symbols in the workplace.

Government of Quebec

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