Skip to main content

Organizers said the security plans for the 18-day fair were modified earlier this year following a number of terror attacks in Europe in which cars were used as deadly weapons.

The organizers of the Canadian National Exhibition, which opened its gates on Friday – one day after two deadly terror attacks in Spain – are reassuring the public that the Toronto event will be safe.

They said the security plans for the 18-day fair were modified earlier this year following a number of terror attacks in Europe in which cars were used as deadly weapons.

"We have hardened some areas around the site that we thought were vulnerable," said Virginia Ludy, the event's chief executive officer. "So we have taken measures so that we can prevent incidents of the nature that we heard about yesterday."

Story continues below advertisement

Thursday's van attack in Barcelona killed 13 people and injured 120, while a car attack early Friday in the Spanish seaside resort of Cambrils left one dead and five injured.

Spanish authorities have said Canada is among 34 countries with citizens killed or injured in the attacks. Global Affairs said Canadians were "affected" by the attacks, but didn't provide further details, citing privacy concerns.

In the past 13 months, there have been nearly a dozen vehicle-ramming attacks in Europe and the United States.

Ms. Ludy said the CNE does not allow vehicles onto the fair's grounds when it is open to the public, but it will be closely monitoring anyone driving on-site with deliveries.

"We can't just stop living our lives," Ms. Ludy said. "We take security and the safety of our visitors very seriously."

Toronto police said they are involved in providing security for the CNE as well, but wouldn't give details on what that entails.

Mayor John Tory said he had discussed security with the city's police chief.

Story continues below advertisement

"He is satisfied with the plans that have been put in place in consultation with the Toronto Police Service by the CNE," Mr. Tory said, as he attended the opening ceremony on Friday morning.

The CNE runs from Aug. 18 to Sept. 4 in Toronto and is expected to attract about 1.5 million people.

Report an error
Comments

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff. Non-subscribers can read and sort comments but will not be able to engage with them in any way. Click here to subscribe.

If you would like to write a letter to the editor, please forward it to letters@globeandmail.com. Readers can also interact with The Globe on Facebook and Twitter .

Welcome to The Globe and Mail’s comment community. This is a space where subscribers can engage with each other and Globe staff.

We aim to create a safe and valuable space for discussion and debate. That means:

  • Treat others as you wish to be treated
  • Criticize ideas, not people
  • Stay on topic
  • Avoid the use of toxic and offensive language
  • Flag bad behaviour

Comments that violate our community guidelines will be removed.

If your comment doesn't appear immediately it has been sent to a member of our moderation team for review

Read our community guidelines here

Discussion loading ...

Due to technical reasons, we have temporarily removed commenting from our articles. We hope to have this fixed soon. Thank you for your patience. If you are looking to give feedback on our new site, please send it along to feedback@globeandmail.com. If you want to write a letter to the editor, please forward to letters@globeandmail.com.