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Photographer Fred Lum visited the back rooms and hallways at the Royal Ontario Museum to get a glimpse of all the hard work behind the scenes.

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Shino Sugimoto, a contract preparator, uses an airscribe to prepare a field jacket containing the remains of at least 2 skeletons of the amphibian Eryops megacephalus. The Eryops skeletons are from the Lower Permian (Geological) Period of Texas and are the 1.5 to 2 m long.

Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail

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David M. Rudkin, Assistant Curator - Palaeobiology Department of Natural History, amongst the collection of samples and specimens stored in cabinets at the Royal Ontario Museum.

Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail

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Centrosaurus bones from Alberta, are protected by plaster/burlap field jackets.

Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail

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David M. Rudkin, Assistant Curator - Palaeobiology Department of Natural History, shows a recently acquired 390 000 000 year old trilobite from Morocco.

Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail

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David M. Rudkin, Assistant Curator - Palaeobiology Department of Natural History points to a singleÊindividual - located in the centre - of Asaphellus stubbsi, which is the unique holotype specimen for this recently described species. A large slab of trilobites from the Draa Valley area of Morocco is of Early Ordovician age (~480 million-years-old). This is a "death assemblage" recording the mass mortality ofÊthree different species of trilobites, probably as a result of storm turbulence on the ancient sea floor.

Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail

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Susan Stock, Conservator, Archaeological Metals points to details of a Brigandine, a red velvet sleeveless jacket, the outside studded with brass headed rivets securing the overlapping steel scales to an inner canvas lining. circa 1500-1530.

Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail

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Susan Stock, Conservator, Archaeological Metals points to details of a Brigandine, a red velvet sleeveless jacket, the outside studded with brass headed rivets securing the overlapping steel scales to an inner canvas lining. circa 1500-1530.

Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail

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A hand drawn picture of dinosaurs was a thank-you present several years ago to a volunteer preparator who had given a friend and the friend's daughter a behind-the-scenes-tour of the fossil galleries at the Royal Ontario Museum. Maddie the artist, now 7, is crazy for science and loves anything to do with dinosaurs, fish, whales and dolphins.

Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail

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Shino Sugimoto, a contract preparator, uses an airscribe to prepare a field jacket containing the remains of at least 2 skeletons of the amphibian Eryops megacephalus. The Eryops skeletons are from the Lower Permian (Geological) Period of Texas and are the 1.5 to 2 m long.

Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail

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Dr. Kim Tait, Curator, Mineralogy at the Royal Ontario Museum, holds up a cross section slice of a meteorite found in Argentina.

Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail

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A meteor impact on the surface of Mars launched this 2.98 kilogram meteorite from the red planet sending it all the way to earth.

Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail

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A magnet sticks to the side of what is known as the Gibeon iron-nickel meteorite, which was found in Namibia. The ROM acquired the 8.5 kg specimen 15 years ago.

Fred Lum/The Globe and Mail

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