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Maple Leaf Gardens abuser charged with sexual assault

A file photo of Gordon Stuckless.

CFTO NEWS

A former minor hockey coach at the heart of the Maple Leaf Gardens pedophile scandal has been arrested again on charges of sexually assaulting two young boys in the 1970s.

Gordon Stuckless, the convicted pedophile who was a regular figure at the rink in the days in which boys were being abused there, was arrested Thursday and faces six new charges, Toronto police said.

The 63-year-old Toronto resident was charged with assaulting two boys, then aged around 11 and 13, "at a school, a community centre and at various other locations in Toronto," the police said in a statement.

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Mr. Stuckless was a worker at the rink, then home ice for the Toronto Maple Leafs, and he was one of several adults there who used their access to lure children over two decades.

Police spokesman Constable Tony Vella said the men who prompted the new charges had come forward to tell their stories. He could not say if the Gardens was one spot where they alleged they had been abused, saying that he could not speak to the evidence gathered by investigators. But he did say that investigators believe they may not be the only people targeted.

"There could be more victims out there," Constable Vella said.

Mr. Stuckless's crimes were initially brought to light by Martin Kruze, who jumped to his death from a Toronto bridge after his abuser was sentenced to two years less a day in prison.

"Too bad that piece of shit didn't do it sooner," a guard heard Mr. Stuckless say to his cellmate, according to documents forwarded to the parole board, the CBC reported in 2001. "Then I wouldn't be here."

The sentence was later extended by the Ontario Court of Appeal to six years, with credit for the year already served. Mr. Stuckless was released in 2001 after serving approximately two-thirds of his sentence.

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Oliver Moore joined the Globe and Mail's web newsroom in 2000 as an editor and then moved into reporting. A native Torontonian, he served four years as Atlantic Bureau Chief and has worked also in Afghanistan, Grenada, France, Spain and the United States. More

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