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The Globe and Mail

A look inside the destroyed Fukushima nuclear plant

Members of the media were allowed into the plant on Saturday for the first time since the March 11 tsunami and earthquake triggered the world's worst nuclear crisis since Chernobyl.

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Japanese officials wearing protective suits and masks ride in the back of a bus while a second bus carrying officials and journalists follow as they drive through the contaminated exclusion zone on their way to the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Fukushima prefecture November 12, 2011.

David Guttenfelder/REUTERS

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The crippled Tokyo Electric Power Co. (Tepco) Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power station is seen through a bus window in Okuma Town, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011. Tepco is struggling to contain the worst nuclear disaster in 25 years.

David Guttenfelder/Bloomberg

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The crippled Tokyo Electric Power Co. (Tepco) Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power station is seen through a bus window in Okuma Town, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011. Tepco is struggling to contain the worst nuclear disaster in 25 years.

David Guttenfelder/Bloomberg

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The Unit 4 reactor building at the crippled Tokyo Electric Power Co. (Tepco) Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power station is seen through a bus window in Okuma Town, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011. Tepco is struggling to contain the worst nuclear disaster in 25 years.

David GuttenfelderBloomberg

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The crippled Tokyo Electric Power Co. (Tepco) Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power station stands in Okuma Town, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011. Tepco is struggling to contain the worst nuclear disaster in 25 years.

David Guttenfelder/Bloomberg

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Broken vehicles are abandoned outside Unit 4 turbine building at the crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station as they are observed from inside a bus in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011. Media allowed into Japan's tsunami-damaged nuclear power plant for the first time Saturday saw a striking scene of devastation: twisted and overturned trucks, crumbling reactor buildings and piles of rubble virtually untouched since the wave struck more than eight months ago.

Ikuro Aiba/Ikuro Aiba/AP

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Crushed piping is observed from inside a bus at the crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011.

Ikuro Aiba/Ikuro Aiba/AP

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Makeshift storm surge barrier fortifies the crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station as it is observed from inside a bus in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011.

Ikuro Aiba/Ikuro Aiba/AP

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Workers in protective suits and masks wait to enter the emergency operation center at the crippled Tokyo Electric Power Co. (Tepco) Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power station in Okuma Town, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011. Tepco is struggling to contain the worst nuclear disaster in 25 years.

David Guttenfelder/Bloomberg

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Men wearing protective suits and masks work at the crippled Tokyo Electric Power Co. (Tepco) Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power station in Okuma Town, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011. Tepco is struggling to contain the worst nuclear disaster in 25 years. Photographer: David Guttenfelder/Pool via Bloomberg

David Guttenfelder/Bloomberg

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Officials from Tokyo Electric Power Co. (Tepco) and Japanese journalists look at the crippled Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power station from bus windows in Okuma Town, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, on Saturday, Nov. 12, 2011. Tepco is struggling to contain the worst nuclear disaster in 25 years.

David Guttenfelder/Bloomberg

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