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The Globe and Mail

Anti-government protesters take to the streets in Algeria, Yemen and Tunisia

Tunisia's revolution spreads as other countries inspired to protest against authoritarian regimes

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Policemen detain a protester (C) during a demonstration in downtown Algiers January 22, 2011. A small group of Algerian opposition supporters trying to hold a banned protest clashed with police in the capital and several people were injured, protest organisers and official media said on Saturday.

STR/Farouk Batiche/Reuters

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Protesters paste a poster of Said Saadi, leader of the secular Rally for Culture and Democracy (RCD) on the shield of a riot police during a demonstration in downtown Algiers, January 22, 2011. A small group of Algerian opposition supporters trying to hold a banned protest clashed with police in the capital and several people were injured, protest organisers and official media said on Saturday.

STR/Farouk Batiche/Reuters

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Protesters chant slogans during a demonstration in downtown Algiers, January 22, 2011. A small group of Algerian opposition supporters trying to hold a banned protest clashed with police in the capital and several people were injured, protest organisers and official media said on Saturday.

STR/Farouk Batiche/Reuters

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Anti-riot policemen block government supporters shouting at opposition supporters during an anti-government rally outside Snaa University campus in Sanaa January 22, 2011.

Khaled Abdullah/Khaled Abdullah/Reuters

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Anti-riot policemen block government supporters as they shout at opposition supporters during an anti-government rally outside Sanaa University campus in Sanaa January 22, 2011.

Khaled Abdullah/Khaled Abdullah/Reuters

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Anti-government protesters shout slogans during a rally in Sanaa January 22, 2011. The sign reads: "Our resources are robbed. Our rights are taken. What is left for us?".

Khaled Abdullah/Khaled Abdullah/Reuters

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A woman raises her fist during a demonstration calling on the new government to quit, on Bourguiba avenue in central Tunis on January 22, 2011. Thousands of people rallied in Tunisia today as the prime minister said he would resign only once the first democratic vote since independence has been held.

MARTIN BUREAU/Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images

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Taxi drivers hold taxi led signs during a demonstration on Bourguiba avenue in central Tunis on January 22, 2011. Thousands of people rallied in Tunisia today calling on their new government to quit, as the prime minister said he would resign only once the first democratic vote since independence has been held.

MARTIN BUREAU/Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images

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Police hold back protestors outside the Tunisian Prime Ministers office on January 22, 2011 in Tunis, Tunisia. Policemen joined the people of Tunis to protest about their working conditions and to distance themselves from ousted former president Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali. Many officers say they are also victims of the Ben Ali regime.

Christopher Furlong/Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

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