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Demonstrators stormed the U.S. embassy in Yemen on Thursday, leading to clashes in which four people were killed, while protesters stoned Washington’s mission in Cairo as anger spread over a US-produced film mocking Islam.

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Protesters shout slogans outside the U.S. embassy in Bayan September 13, 2012. Demonstrations spread further on Thursday, with U.S. embassies again the targets of popular anger among Muslims questioning why the United States has failed to take action against the makers of a film they consider blasphemous to Islam. Around 200 demonstrators shouted slogans outside the U.S. embassy in Kuwait as riot police encircled the crowd of men protesting peacefully in their traditional Kuwaiti dress.

STEPHANIE MCGEHEE/REUTERS

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Lebanese Muslim protesters burn the American and Israeli flags during a protest about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in the southern port city of Sidon, Lebanon, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012.

Mohammad Zaatari/AP

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Lebanese Muslim protesters burn the Israeli flag during a protest about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad, in the southern port city of Sidon, Lebanon, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012.

Mohammad Zaatari/AP

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FILE - In this Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012 file photo, Egyptian protesters carry their national flag and a flag with Arabic that reads "No God but Allah, and Mohammed is his prophet," and chant anti U.S. slogans during a demonstration in front of the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, as part of widespread anger across the Muslim world about a film ridiculing Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

Nasser Nasser/AP

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A protester throws a stone towards riot police, during clashes along a road which leads to the U.S. embassy, near Tahrir Square in Cairo September 13, 2012. Egypt's President Mohamed Mursi said on Thursday he supported peaceful protest but not attacks on embassies, after Egyptians angry at a film deemed insulting to the Prophet Mohammad climbed into the U.S. embassy in Cairo and tore down the U.S. flag.

MOHAMED ABD EL GHANY/REUTERS

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A protester throws a tear gas canister, which was earlier thrown by riot police, during clashes along a road which leads to the U.S. embassy, near Tahrir Square in Cairo September 13, 2012.

MOHAMED ABD EL GHANY/REUTERS

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A protester sets fire to police vehicles during clashes with riot police along a road which leads to the U.S. embassy, near Tahrir Square in Cairo September 13, 2012.

MOHAMED ABD EL GHANY/REUTERS

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Riot policemen take cover from stones that were thrown by protesters during clashes with protesters along a road which leads to the U.S. embassy, near Tahrir Square in Cairo, September 13, 2012.

MOHAMED ABD EL GHANY/REUTERS

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Protesters set a police vehicle on fire during clashes with riot police along a road which leads to the U.S. embassy, near Tahrir Square in Cairo September 13, 2012. Egypt's President Mohamed Mursi said on Thursday he supported peaceful protests but not attacks on embassies, after Egyptians angry at a film deemed insulting to the Prophet Mohammad climbed into the U.S. embassy in Cairo and tore down the U.S. flag. He pledged to protect foreigners in Egypt.

MOHAMED ABD EL GHANY/REUTERS

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Egyptian riot police throw stones at protesters during clashes near the U.S. embassy in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Sept. 13, 2012. Protesters clashed with police near the U.S. Embassy in Cairo for the third day in a row. Egypt's Islamist President Mohammed Morsi vowed to protect foreign embassies in Cairo, where police were using tear gas to disperse protesters at the U.S. mission.

Khalil Hamra/AP

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Palestinian Salafists burn a U.S flag during a protest against what they said was a film being produced in the United States that was insulting to the Prophet Mohammad, in Gaza City September 13, 2012.

MOHAMMED SALEM/REUTERS

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